Bias, Rhetorical Devices, and Argumentation

Bias, Rhetorical Devices, and Argumentation - Bias,...

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Bias, Rhetorical Devices, and Argumentation In the transcript of the campaign speech, there are many examples of bias, fallacies, and rhetorical devices. The first example is of bias; it is at the beginning of the speech when the campaigner states, "I am speaking of Charles Foster Kane, the fighting liberal, the friend to the working man, the next Governor of this State. .."; this is an example of political bias. The next examples are of fallacies. Scapegoating is used to try to blame one man for an entire State's government's problems; "...to point out and make public the dishonesty, the downright villainy, of Boss Jim W. Getty's political machine. ..". Another example of a fallacy used in the speech is a scare tactic. The speaker tries to induce fear by attempting to make the general public believe that one undesirable man has complete control over the government; ". ..Boss Jim W. Gettys political machine -- now in complete control of the government of this state!". The last example is of a rhetorical device.
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This note was uploaded on 07/18/2011 for the course COM 220 taught by Professor Unknown during the Winter '08 term at University of Phoenix.

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Bias, Rhetorical Devices, and Argumentation - Bias,...

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