Chapter14 - Chapter 14: Coastal Wetlands Coastal Wetland:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Chapter 14: Coastal Wetlands Coastal Wetland : vegetated intertidal environment Salt Marshes Mangroves Vegetation Distribution Classification Global Climate Change Wetlands •Low energy environments Why Study Coastal Wetlands •Coastal wetlands currently make up about 30% of the wetlands in the lower 48 states, or approximately 27 million acres. •Marshes produce biomass measuring nearly 20 tons to the acre, making them four times more productive than the most productive farmland. •An estimated 80 percent of fish caught commercially spend some time in coastal wetlands or are dependent on food chains which can be traced back to these coastal environments Complex Ecosystems •81% of coastal wetlands are in the southeast •Gulf of Mexico region includes 51% •Pacific coast (excluding Alaska and Hawaii) contains less than 2%. •Most coastal wetlands (77%) occur in or adjacent to estuaries. US Wetland Statistics The 10 states with the most coastal wetlands: Florida Louisiana South Carolina Texas North Carolina Georgia Alabama New Jersey California Maine
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Global Distribution of Coastal Wetlands Mangroves can not survive in freezing temperatures Tidal Creeks Sediments brought to the marsh through tidal creeks Extensive wetting and drying Vegetation controlled by inundation Sharp Transition Between Zones Low Marsh = neap low tide to mean tide level High Marsh = mean tide level to spring high tide Low Marsh
Background image of page 2
3 High Marsh Meadow is high in the intertidal zone Dominated by Spartina patens S. patens is less salt-tolerant than S. alterniflora. In the foreground is a small band of S. alterniflora . Distichlis spicata Salicornia can be found in the highest part of the intertidal zone. They are very salt tolerant, and only about 5 cm high. Formation of a salt marsh 1. Arrival of a seed or the rafting of a plant of the cord grass Spartina alterniflora . 2. Once established grass spreads
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/18/2011 for the course EARTH SCIE 334 taught by Professor Buonaiuto during the Fall '09 term at CUNY Hunter.

Page1 / 8

Chapter14 - Chapter 14: Coastal Wetlands Coastal Wetland:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online