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chapter4gh - Chapter 4 Moisture and Atmospheric Stability I...

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1 Chapter 4 Moisture and Atmospheric Stability I. Movement of Water Through the Atmosphere II. Water’s Changes of State III. Humidity: Water Vapor in the Air IV. Humidity Measurement VI. Lifting Processes VII. Atmospheric Stability VIII. Stability and Daily Weather The Hydrologic Cycle: the unending circulation of Earth’s water supply Processes: evaporation, precipitation, transpiration, infiltration, runoff The Water Balance: quantitative view of the hydrologic cycle The Atmosphere: connects the ocean with the land surface. Greater movement of water through air than rivers II. Water’s Changes of State Water = only substance that exists in all three states within the atmosphere Ice: low kinetic energy, molecules arranged in an orderly network ( crystal lattice ) Liquid Water: higher kinetic energy, molecules slide past each other Water Vapor: highest kinetic energy, distance between molecules increase, highly compressible PDF Created with deskPDF PDF Writer - Trial :: http://www.docudesk.com
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2 Interesting Properties of Water Readily converted between states Solid phase ( ice ) is less dense than liquid phase Unusually high heat capacity hydrogen bonds H 2 O covalent bonds : shared pairs of electrons hydrogen bonds : weak magnetic bonds between water molecules due to polar structure Ice: as kinetic energy decreases, hydrogen bonding becomes important in controlling the crystal structure Water: as kinetic energy increases, hydrogen bonds are broken water molecules move closer together Castle berg PDF Created with deskPDF PDF Writer - Trial :: http://www.docudesk.com
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3 II. Water’s Changes of State B. Latent (hidden) heat: heat required to change the state of water, without an accompanying rise in temperature
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