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Research Methods Part 2 - Standardized Testing

Research Methods Part 2 - Standardized Testing - Research...

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Research Methods – Part II 1 Standardized Testing – Research Methods Part II Standardized Testing – Research Methods Part II Tony Bertussi Kim Love Dawn Lazetera Bill Tremblay Jolynn Weeks QNT 561 April 20, 2011 Patricia Towne
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Research Methods – Part II 2 Standardized Testing Whether the standardized test in question is the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), the American College Test (ACT), or grade school aptitude test, Team A believes these tests to be designed with bias, as they are geared towards the white male populace. Over this course, we will prove our hypothesis to be true by analyzing data using various statistical techniques. Sample Design The target population for the survey is school administrators and teachers, as the survey includes questions about standardized testing and education in schools. The survey will be given to 800 randomly selected individuals representing our target population. A population sample of 800, with a survey return rate of 50%, a confidence level of 95% and error rate of 5% gives us a desired population of 384. This information was determined by using the amount of teachers and administrators in the U.S. in 2010, which was 7.2 million. Team A will use the Likert scale, a commonly used method of researching survey data. “It is often used to measure respondents' attitudes by asking the extent to which they agree or disagree with a particular question or statement” (Hall, January 24, 2011).
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