Module four[1] - THE STATE Module Four VIEW OF THE STATE...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
T HE S TATE Module Four
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
V IEW OF THE S TATE Liberals: state is sovereign but not an autonomous actor. The state is a pluralist arena whose function is to maintain the basic rules of the game. Realists: The state is an autonomous actor constrained only by anarchy. The state is sovereign within its borders and it is guided by national interest defined in terms of power. Radicals: State is the agent of the bourgeoisie and it is influenced by pressures from the capitalist class. State behavior reflects economic goals. Real sovereignty is not possible because state reacts to capitalist interest.
Background image of page 2
Constructivits: National interests and national identities are social constructs, they are ideational, ever-changing, and evolving. States share goals and values, which they are socialized into.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
N ATURE AND S OURCE OF S TATE P OWER Power is the ability to influence others and control the outcome. Whether power is effective at influencing outcomes depends on the power potential of each party. Natural Sources of Power: 1) Geographic size and position 2) Natural resources 3) Population size
Background image of page 4
-Industrial development allows you to overcome any weaknesses in the natural sources of power. -Industrialized states generally have higher educational levels, more advanced technology, and more efficient use of money. All adding to their tangible power. Intangible Sources of Power: National image, public support, leadership etc. The perception by other states of public support and cohesion is another source of intangible power. Leadership is another source of intangible power.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/19/2011 for the course POLIT 1550 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Youngstown State University.

Page1 / 16

Module four[1] - THE STATE Module Four VIEW OF THE STATE...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online