{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Module six[1] - Intergovernmental organizations(IGOs and...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Intergovernmental organizations (IGOs) and Nongovernmental Organizations (NGOs) International law is also important in international politics.
Image of page 2
One ways states arrange themselves for purposes of promoting cooperative and collaborative practices in world politics, is the creation of international organizations. The charters of many International Organizations (IOs), such as the United Nations their rules, agreements, and resolutions constitute many of the bylaws of everyday international interaction.
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
IOs help in coordinating states’ compliance, in organizing states around their common interests, and in pointing out the benefits of cooperation. Large regional organizations such as the EU have worked extensively to promote economic cooperation. Realists usually see international organizations as of little importance, the same way they view international law. They obviously exist and states conduct much of their business in forums provided by such organizations.
Image of page 4
IOs can be divided into two broad categories, intergovernmental organizations and nongovernmental organizations. Intergovernmental organizations (IGOs) are associations of sovereign states that are established through formal agreements. Include the United Nations, NATO, European Union. Nongovernmental Organizations (NGOs) are groups of institutions and individuals established through more informal means. Greenpeace, Amnesty International.
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Even though NGOs do not include states in their membership, and so lie outside the structure of traditional international politics, many have exerted a significant impact on world affairs. Groups such as Amnesty International have influenced governments’ policies through public pressure and lobbying whereas organizations like Doctors without borders have acted directly to provide humanitarian relief.
Image of page 6
For liberals, IGOs enable states to overcome the information deficiencies, -they reduce transaction costs of negotiating, researching, gathering information, and complying with agreements, -they make commitments more credible, -they establish focal points for coordination and, -they facilitate cooperation by overcoming the Prisoner’s Dilemma.
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Three theories on the formation of IOs 1) Federalism: Peace and the elimination of war can be achieved if states gave up their sovereignty and invested in the formation of a federal international organization. 2) Functionalism: IOs are created to solve specific economic problems. Through cooperation, economic disparities will be eliminated and war will be less likely.
Image of page 8
3) Collective Goods: IOs are formed to assist states to overcome the collective action problem or the tragedy of the commons.
Image of page 9

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
As an institution, the UN has three unique strengths: 1) It is near-global in membership; at its founding in 1945 it constituted 51 members, after decolonization and the collapse of Soviet Union its membership reached 185.
Image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern