Chapter 25 - no breaks. They were forced to do work and it...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
What happened to the "promise of reason" at the beginning of the 18th c.? Use specific details from this chapter. The promise of reason went out the door in the 18th century when Industrial Revolution and the  Transatlantic Slave Trade took over. Industrialization was the invention of technology and machines.  It was a faster and easier way to produce goods and services. It was a bunch of labor in these  factories so they would take advantage of the women and children, making them work for barely  anything and for a lot of hours at a time. The Transatlantic Slave Trade was where millions of Africans got shipped to go work for other  people. It was cruel and harsh. No one should have to call someone their owner and no man should  be a person's property. They had to work all day in the harsh hot conditions for really long hours with 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: no breaks. They were forced to do work and it wasn't any easy job. The slaves got disrespected and worked in the fields. They had a very prosperous Sugar Trade going on. It makes me sick to even think about this. Just because somebody is a different race we treated them like this in the old days. Those African people suffered and were put through so much. People soon forgot about the "Promise of Reason" Back in the 18th Century it seemed like. The beginning of the Industrial Revolution and the very wide growth of the Slave Trade just made people forget what mattered and how things should have been and not the terrible way it was....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 07/19/2011 for the course HUM 2230 taught by Professor Sarahblanton during the Summer '11 term at Daytona State College.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online