3.2 - UNIT 3 Introduction to the Axial and Appendicular...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
UNIT 3 Introduction to the Axial and Appendicular Skeletons (Ch. 7) Introduction to the Axial Skeleton Introduction to the Appendicular Skeleton Disorders of the Axial and Appendicular Skeletons (7th edition)
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
How to Study for this Unit: Please note: do not try to learn the specific bone structures of the axial and appendicular skeletons in the figures in Chapter 7; you will learn them in your next units (Units 4 & 5); focus on the following lecture notes that I have provided for you to study for Unit 3; you are familiarizing yourself with the axial and appendicular skeletons (7th edition)
Image of page 2
Overview of the Skeleton Consists of bones, cartilage, joints, and ligaments Composed of 206 named bones grouped into two divisions: AXIAL skeleton (80 bones) - consists of skull , vertebral column (including sacrum and coccyx ), bony thorax ( sternum , ribs , and associated cartilage), and hyoid bone APPENDICULAR skeleton (126 bones) - the bones of the appendages, including the pectoral girdle ( clavicle and scapula ), arm, hand, hip ( os coxae ), leg, and foot bones (7th edition)
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Axial Skeleton (7th edition)
Image of page 4
The Skull - most skull bones are flat bones CRANIAL Bones - form the brain’s protective shell enclose and protect the brain provide attachment sites for some head and neck muscles include the frontal, parietal, occipital, temporal, sphenoid, and ethmoid bones FACIAL Bones - the skeleton of the face form the framework of the face form cavities for the sense organs of sight, smell, and taste provide openings for the passage of air and food hold the teeth anchor the muscles of the face include the unpaired mandible and vomer , plus the paired maxillary, zygomatic, nasal, lacrimal, and palatine bones and the paired inferior nasal conchae (7th edition)
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
SUTURES - have an irregular, saw-toothed appearance longest sutures (e.g. coronal, sagittal, squamous, and lamboid ) connect the cranial bones other sutures connect facial bones and are named based on the bones that they connect (7th edition)
Image of page 6
Special Parts of the Skull NASAL CAVITY - composed of bone and cartilage; the three conchae form air passageways called meatuses ; the nasal septum , which is composed of the perpendicular plate, vomer, and septal cartilage , divides the cavity into right and left halves ORBITS (fig. 7.9) - bony cavities that hold the eyes, muscles of the eyes,
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern