Theorizing paper

Theorizing paper - theory itself 7. Create a second...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Theorizing paper 12 Steps: 1. Describe an event or observation in the world that someone wants to understand. (Tell your observation.) 2. Create an explanation for the event. (Try to explain.) 3. Make the explanation more general . (ABTRACT; 1 formula fit all; applicable to a variety of phenomena) 4. Derive predictions from the explanation. (Predict based on your explanations.) 5. Test the predictions . (See if your predictions are true?) 6. Use the obtained outcomes to confirm, revise, expand, generalize or abandon the original set of propositions. (use the obtained data to approve/disapprove your original set of propositions) Discrepancy in results must be explained either through a methodological/theoretical resolution Methodological Resolution =explain results by reference to the procedures employed in conducting the research Theoretical resolution =explain by suggesting modifications to the
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: theory itself 7. Create a second plausible explanation for the event. [Just like Step 2] 2 nd explanation must be DIFFERENT from the 1 st one New viewpoint and additional insights 8. Generalize the second explanation. [Just like Step 3] 9. Derive predictions from the second explanation such that one of the predictions contradicts a prediction from the first explanation. [kinda like Step 4] 10. Conduct a critical test to evaluate the rival explanations [Step 5] (Test and compare set of Explanation A and B) Compare CONTRADICTORY PREDICTIONS 11. Use the obtained outcomes to confirm, expand, or generalize the supported theory and to revise, modify, or abandon the unsupported theory. (Use results to pick 1 final theory) 12. Use the obtained knowledge to improve the world....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 07/20/2011 for the course CMN 101 taught by Professor Feng during the Fall '08 term at UC Davis.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online