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secondlaw1 - The Second Law of Thermodynamics (I) (This...

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The Second Law of Thermodynamics (I) (This slides summarize the content of Nov. 24, 2003) 1 Introduction to the Second Law 2 Temperature Reservoirs 3 Heat Engines
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Common Processes for Explaining the Second Law (1) A cup of hot coffee does not get hotter in a cooler room. (2) Transferring heat to a wire will not generate electricity. (3) Transferring heat to a paddle wheel will not cause it to rotate. Introduction to the Second Law
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The first law of thermodynamics places no restriction on the direction of a process , but satisfy the first law does not ensure that that that process will actually occur. This inadequacy of the first law to identify whether a process can take place is remedied by introducing the second law of thermodynamics. The second law also asserts that energy has quality as well as quantity . More of high-temperature energy can be converted to work, and thus it has a higher quality than the same amount of energy at a lower temperature. The second law also can be used in determining the theoretical limits of heat engines and refrigerators , as well as predicting the degree of completion of chemical reactions. Introduction to the Second Law (continued)
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Thermal Energy Reservoirs In the development of the second law of thermodynamics, it is very convenient to have a hypothetical body with a relatively large thermal energy capacity that can supply or absorb finite amounts of heat without undergoing any change in temperature, such as body is called thermal energy (heat) reservoir or temperature reservoir . Examples are atmosphere, two-phase systems, and even the air in a room. A reservoir that supplies energy in the form of heat is called a source , and one that absorbs energy in the form of heat is called a sink .
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Heat Engines Devices (figure at right) that converts heat into work is called heat engines , which can be characterized by the following: 1. They receive heat from high-
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This note was uploaded on 07/21/2011 for the course EML 3100 taught by Professor Staff during the Summer '10 term at FSU.

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secondlaw1 - The Second Law of Thermodynamics (I) (This...

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