Bio_Anthro_Test_3

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Unformatted text preview: Click to edit Master subtitle style 7/22/11 Tori Pohlner study guide Bio Anthro Test 3 7/22/11 Large brain Primitive jaw and teeth Accepted bc of conformity to preconceptions about human evolution and nationalism Piltdown Hoax 7/22/11 Australopithecus africanus Discovered by Raymond Dart Taung child 7/22/11 Bipedal Robert Broom Homonid 7/22/11 Origins of bipedalsim Environmental change Subsistence change Pair-bonding Maternal carrying “radiator” theory Exploitation of open habitats Increased brain size Tool-making Scenarios for origin of homonids & trends in early 7/22/11 Many parts of DNA mutate at constat rates with no selection (“neutral” mutations). If you can calibrate the rate of change (against the fossil record of a well-known group of organisms), you can predict how much time has elapsed since two species shared a common ancestor Molecular clocks Early Hominin 7/22/11 East Africa 6-7 million years ago Single skull w/jaws and teeeth 350 cc brain Small canine teeth Mix of primitive ape-like features and derived human-like features Sahelanthropus tchadensis Early Hominin 7/22/11 East Africa 6 million years old Tantalizing jaws, teeth, and limb bones Evidence for bipedality in limbs Orrorin tugensis Early Hominin 7/22/11 East Africa 5.8-5.2 million years ago Fragmentary teeth and bones similar to Ardipithecus ramidus Currently significant due to dates Ardipithecus kadabba Early Hominin 7/22/11 East Africa 4.4 million years old Large canine teeth (but still small compared to great ape) Thin molar enamel Partly splayed big toe Foramen magnum moved forward Small head Lack of sexual dimorphism Possibly bipedal w/large grasping big toe Ardipithecus ramidus Early Hominin 7/22/11 East Africa 4.1-3.9 million years ago Large canine teeth Thick molar tooth enamel bipedal Australopithecus anamensis Australopithecine s 7/22/11 East Africa 3.9-3.0 million years ago Abundant remains Projecting (prognathic) face Large canines Small brain (310-400 cc) Clearly bipedal but not as efficient as modern humans Curved fingers and toes (also climbed trees) Australopithecus afarensis Australopithecine s 7/22/11 South Africa 3.0-2.5 million years ago Taung child was first discovery More rounded skull than A. afarensis Brain size 428-510 cc Smaller canines Skeleton similar to A. afarensis Australopithecus africanus Australopithecine s 7/22/11 East Africa 2.5-2.3 million years ago2....
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This note was uploaded on 07/22/2011 for the course ANTH 1013 taught by Professor Nolan during the Spring '08 term at Arkansas.

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