Cognitive+Biases+Cognitive+Dissonance-1

Cognitive+Biases+Cognitive+Dissonance-1 -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Cognitive Dissonance Theory Leon Festinger 1919-1989 Does this image blow your mind ?
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Humans have a strong tendency towards cognitive consistency Cognitive Dissonance Theory (Festinger 1957) (dominant theory in SP for 20 yrs) Holding apparently incompatible, or logically inconsistent, thoughts about ourselves, others, or the world produces cognitive dissonance The state of dissonance is uncomfortable The mind seeks a resolution to the discomfort by rejecting or changing one or more of the inconsistent cognitions This dissonance reduction goes on largely outside of our awareness
Background image of page 2
More examples of cognitive dissonance Modern and “sophisticated” artwork tends to jar our sensibilities, challenge our assumptions, or otherwise create cognitive dissonance People tend to find this an acquired (or unacquirable) taste In music: improvisational jazz, punk rock In books and movies: complex morality, lack of good/bad guys, anti-hero’s, no happy endings, unreliable narrators Books: Ulysses, The Stranger, Catcher in the Rye, Crime and Punishment Movies: The Grand Illusion, The Graduate, Pulp Fiction, Sideways Examples from visual art…
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2 - Marcel Duchamp
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 6
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 8
Fountain - Marcel Duchamp
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
When people find their cognitions at odds or inconsistent somehow, they seek to resolve the dissonance (i.e., create consonance, or consistency) But how do you resolve dissonance between two thoughts, A and B? You can stop believing in one, I.e. disregard You can flip your belief in A or B (I.e. to not A , or not B ) You can distort one to fall in line with the other You can add an additional cognition that resolves conflict Disregard , change belief , distort, or add
Background image of page 10
For example: a friend says something offensive… Disregard: You can disregard the offending comment, or disregard the friendship Change: You can adopt the offensive belief, or admire your friend less Distort : You can pretend your friend meant something else Add : Your friend was having a bad day For example: you think you’re good at basketball, but you get beat in 1 on 1… Disregard: You can disregard/forget the incident
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/21/2011 for the course SOC 150a taught by Professor Willer during the Fall '09 term at University of California, Berkeley.

Page1 / 27

Cognitive+Biases+Cognitive+Dissonance-1 -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 12. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online