Bio Ch 6 Slides - Chapter 6 A tour of the cell Some fun...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 6 A tour of the cell
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Some fun facts about cells The largest single cell is an ostrich egg. The simplest cell is a bacterial cell. (NOT a virus!) The longest cell is found within nerve cells in the colossal squid, with some nerve cells estimated to be over 10 meters in length.
Background image of page 2
The Fundamental Units of Life • All organisms are made of cells. • The cell is the simplest collection of matter. that can live: the basic unit of life. • Cell structure is correlated to cellular function. Prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells have different structures, therefore, are capable of performing different functions.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Outline of the lecture • Techniques to study cells and their structures. * • Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic cells. (worksheet) • Organelles involved in energy processing. (worksheet) • Protein synthesis and its machinery. * • Animal and plant cells. (worksheet) • And the other tales. (worksheet)
Background image of page 4
How do we study cells? By staining!
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
ACTUAL SIZE (AVERAGE) PERCEIVED SIZE WHEN MAGNIFIED 3 MILLION TIMES Cell diameter 30 micrometers * = 0.03 mm 300 feet Nucleus diameter 5 micrometers 50 feet Mitochondrion length Typically 1–2 micrometers, but can be up to 7 micrometers long 18 feet Lysosome diameter 50–3,000 nanometers * 5 inches to 30 feet Ribosome diameter 20–30 nanometers 2–3 inches Microtubule width 25 nanometers 3 inches Intermediate filament width 10 nanometers 1.2 inches Actin filament width 5–9 nanometers 0.5–1 inch A football stadium is 360 feet long.
Background image of page 6
Microscopy Scientists use microscopes to visualize cells too small to see with the naked eye. In a light microscope (LM) , visible light passes through a specimen and then through glass lenses, which magnify the image. The quality of an image depends on Magnification , the ratio of an object’s image size to its real size. Resolution , the measure of the clarity of the image, or the minimum distance of two distinguishable points. Contrast , visible differences in parts of the sample.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Advantages of LM • LMs can magnify effectively to about 1,000 times the size of the actual specimen. • The level of resolution is inherent to the microscopes. • Various techniques enhance con trast and enable cell components to be stained or labeled.
Background image of page 8
Various techniques to enhance contrasts including staining Visible staining by depositing pigments on samples Adjustment of the light microscopic setting Fluorescent staining and tagging: Confocal microscopy Visualization of live cells
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Limitations of LM Most subcellular structures, including organelles (membrane-enclosed compartments), are too small to be resolved by an LM. Two basic types of electron microscopes (EMs) are used to study subcellular structures: Scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) focus a beam of electrons onto the surface of a specimen, providing images that look 3-D Transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) focus a beam of electrons through a specimen TEMs are used mainly to study the internal structure of cells
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 49

Bio Ch 6 Slides - Chapter 6 A tour of the cell Some fun...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online