Philosophy Exam 1 Study Guide

Philosophy Exam 1 Study Guide - Exam 1 Study Guide General...

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Exam 1 Study Guide General Instructions : The exam will be divided into two parts: Short Answer and Essay. Short answer questions will require you to write a paragraph (roughly half a page to one page) explaining a particular argument, philosophical position, an objection to an argument or position, or some combination of these. Essay questions will require you to go into greater detail about an argument or position or to compare and contrast rival views, and in either case to reflect critically on some central themes and ideas touched upon in this unit. Be sure on both parts of the exam to address all parts of any question you choose to answer. On the exam, you will have some choice of questions on both parts, although not all the questions on this study guide will appear on the exam. (However, any question asked on the exam will be taken from this study guide.) The exam is worth twenty (20) points, and each section is worth ten (10) points. You will have to answer two or three short answer questions and one essay on the exam. Feel free to e- mail me (see above) with questions, sample answers, or outlines, as you study for the exam. Please bring a blue book on the exam day (and do not mark anywhere on it until I tell you to). Part A: Short Answers: Be prepared to write a paragraph (half a page to one page) on the following questions. You will have to answer two or three of these questions on the exam. 1. Briefly explain what Cartesian (substance) dualism is. Explain one way Descartes argues that the mind and body are separate, and discuss one objection to this theory. Cartesian dualism is a belief that there are both material and mental things. Descartes argues that the mind and the body are separate in the divisibility theory in which he states that if the mind and the body were the same thing then everything that were true of one thing would be true of the other concluding that the mind and the body are not the same thin but distinct entities. An objection to this theory one possible criticism for this argument is The casual interaction problem which states that how can something non- physical produce physical effects such as feeling embarrassed causes us to blush .On how these feelings cause stimulation of the brain to rush the blood to our cheeks causing us to blush. 2. Explain how Descartes argues--via the conceivability argument-- that he is not his body. If he isn't his body, then what is he? Discuss one possible criticism of this argument. Descartes states that he is his mind not his body through the conceivability argument bu stating that it is conceivable for him to exist without a body, and whatever is conceivable is logically possible, so its possible for him to exist w/o a body, and if it is possible for him to exist w/o a body then having a body is inessential to him. If he is not his body then he is his mind which is supported through part 2 of the conceivability argument which states that its inconceivable for him to exist w/o a mind, and whatever is inconceivable is
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This note was uploaded on 07/22/2011 for the course PHIL 2003 taught by Professor Barber during the Spring '08 term at Arkansas.

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Philosophy Exam 1 Study Guide - Exam 1 Study Guide General...

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