discrete sources and entropy

discrete sources and entropy - EEL 3531: Information Theory...

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EEL 3531: Discrete Sources and Entropy Page 1 Mark Llewellyn © EEL 3531: Information Theory Spring 2009 Discrete Sources and Entropy School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of Central Florida Instructor : Dr. Mark Llewellyn markl@cs.ucf.edu HEC 236, 407-823-2790 http://www.cs.ucf.edu/courses/eel3531/spr2009
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EEL 3531: Discrete Sources and Entropy Page 2 Mark Llewellyn © Overview of Digital Communication In a general sense, a communication system is a system which sends information from one place to another. Examples include the telephone network, radio, television, cellular phones, LANs, and so on. Storage systems are systems for the storage and subsequent retrieval of information. In a sense, they may be regarded as communication systems that transmit information from now (the present) to then (the future). Examples include magnetic and optical disks drives, video tape players, pictures, flash drives, and so on.
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EEL 3531: Discrete Sources and Entropy Page 3 Mark Llewellyn © Overview of Digital Communication In all cases, there is a source from which the information originates. Information from the source is processed by a system for encoding and modulating the information. The encoding/modulating processes the information into some form of signal which is designed to facilitate the transmission (or storage) of the information in physical form. The output of the encoding system is then transmitted through some physical communication channel (for communication systems) or stored in some physical storage medium (for storage systems). Examples include wireless transmission using electromagnetic waves and wire transmission using copper telephone cables or fiber optic cables.
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EEL 3531: Discrete Sources and Entropy Page 4 Mark Llewellyn © Overview of Digital Communication Regardless of the specific form of the transmission medium, we’ll refer to this as the channel . Information conveyed through the channel must be recovered at the destination and processed to restore the original representation of the information. This is the task of the decoder/demodulator . The signal processing performed by the decoder can be thought of as the inverse of the function performed by the encoder. The output of the decoder is the presented to the final user or destination, which is usually referred to as the information sink .
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EEL 3531: Discrete Sources and Entropy Page 5 Mark Llewellyn © Overview of Digital Communication
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discrete sources and entropy - EEL 3531: Information Theory...

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