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Group 6-4 - Cellular Technologies BY Jarryd Levine Stephen...

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Cellular Technologies BY: Jarryd Levine Stephen Rockward Tanares Jefferson Totiro Clark
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First Generation
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Two way radios were first used in vehicles such as taxis, ambulances, police cruisers, etc. There were permanently fixed in the car and were unable to dial different phone numbers. 1940- Motorola develops Walkie-Talkie (backpacked two way radio) Continued to develop into the “Handie Talkie” Development of Two-Way Radio Communication
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Introduction to Cellular Technology A cell phone is nothing more than a sophisticated radio. Since the technology was first developed around making/receiving phone calls, more and more features continue to be added: Store vital contact information PDA Internet usage Send/receive e-mail Web browsing Play games Text Message Watch TV GPS Play Music
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Cell Phone Frequencies In the early stages of car phones, there was one central antenna tower per city with approximately 25 channels per tower. With so few channels, it limited the number of people who were actually able to rely on the analog network. The term ‘cell phone’ comes from the concept of dividing cities into ‘cells’ to allow reuse of transmission frequencies Now the typical analog cell phone carrier receives about 832 frequencies to use across a city with cells sized at about 10 miles in hexagonal grids. Personal transmitter needed to be able to broadcast 40-50 miles
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Cell phone Channels A single cell in an analog phone uses 1/7 of the available channels so that each cell has a unique set of frequencies and no collisions. A cell phone carrier gets 832 frequencies per city Each phone uses 2 frequencies for a phone call Upstream Downstream This gives the carrier 395 voice channels and 42 control frequencies. With 1/7 of the frequencies being used, that allows approximately 56 users per cell at any given time in an analog network
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Cell Phone Codes From the moment you turn your phone on, codes are transmitted back and forth between your phone and the MTSO (Mobile Telephone Switching Office) The communication between the MTSO and individual phones is done on the extra ‘control’ channels.
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