Group 13-2 - XSSOverview WhatisCrossSiteScripting?

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
XSS - Overview What is Cross Site Scripting? Cross Site Scripting is a type of vulnerability found in  web applications. When exploited, It allows an attacker  to gain access to sensitive data.  This access is gained by code injection. Code injection  is when code is introduced into a program or application  to change it’s course of execution. Note:  Cross Site Scripting is sometimes abbreviated as  CSS, This is not a good practice as it can lead to  confusion with Cascading Style Sheets also CSS, a  technology used to add style to HTML documents.  Instead Cross Site Scripting should be abbreviated as  XSS.
Background image of page 2
XSS – Overview How Does Cross Site Scripting work? A malicious user injects code into a website with a XSS  vulnerability. This can be done in numerous ways. Some  examples are: Linking to a site and embedding malicious code in the url. Posting malicious code to a message board, where it is saved  to a database and subsequently displayed to other users. Because the code is injected into a vulnerable site, it  appears to be coming from the site itself, sidestepping  same origin policies that say scripts can only access  properties and methods of the site they originated from.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Whatever the method of delivery, the true attack in XSS  occurs when a user loads the affected site in their  browser. The injected code is executed on the client’s machine. This  code can be designed to do harmful things such as steal the  client’s session cookie, giving the attacker access to sensitive  information like the client’s authentication credentials or billing  information from the affected site. This data can then be  transmitted back to the attacker for further use. In most cases, the user is unaware of the attack while it is 
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/24/2011 for the course EEL 3531 taught by Professor Llewelyn during the Spring '09 term at University of Florida.

Page1 / 17

Group 13-2 - XSSOverview WhatisCrossSiteScripting?

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online