2.1 Introduction to Waves

2.1 Introduction to Waves - 2.1Waves ScienceofMusic 2007

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
    2.1 Waves Science of Music 2007
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    A Brief Return to Last Time We discussed oscillations of springs and  pendulums.  We defined frequency f and period T=(1/f). We also reviewed Newton’s Laws: An object in motion will tend to move at the same  velocity unless acted upon by an external force. Constant velocity or static conditions are both referred  to as equilibrium . F=ma Action = Reaction
Background image of page 2
    Last time: Concept … Tension
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Which force (a “vector”) pulls UP more: F F
Background image of page 4
    The Musical String Force = F L initial T T T The Bigger the angle the more T points UP! The distance “x” is the same sort of thing as the x in F=-kx. ANGLE
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    The Guitar Strings
Background image of page 6
    Consider Two Situations For the same “x” the restoring force is double because the angle is  double. The “mass” is about half because we only have half of the string vibrating.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    So… For the same “x” the restoring force is double because the angle is  double. The “mass” is about half because we only have half of the string vibrating. m k f kx F π 2 1 = - = k doubles m -> m/2 f doubles!
Background image of page 8
    It has been shown that … k" " constant spring a like Looks area sectional - cress the is A material a for constant a is E with pull you force the is F = initial stretch initial L EA L L EA F The “stretch” produces the restoring force.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Guitar Pressing the fret that is in the middle of the  string doubles the frequency~ Walla … the octave In general … the frequency is proportional  to the length of the string.
Background image of page 10
    Interlude…. .
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/24/2011 for the course MUS 3930 taught by Professor Bindell during the Fall '07 term at University of Central Florida.

Page1 / 65

2.1 Introduction to Waves - 2.1Waves ScienceofMusic 2007

This preview shows document pages 1 - 12. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online