Ethics_Class_3_Virtue_and_Character[1]

Ethics_Class_3_Virtue_and_Character[1] - Ethics Virtue and...

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1 Ethics Virtue and Personal Responsibility
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2 REVIEW What is deontology? How is it different from utilitarianism? What is the difference from a categorical imperative and a hypothetical imperative?
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3 REVIEW What are the three tests of Kant’s categorical imperative? Universal “Act only according to that maxim by which you can at the same time will that it should become a universal law.” Respect Others “Treat others as an end and not as a means to an end” Individual autonomy/No coercion
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4 REVIEW Some have said that lying cannot be made universal, that there are times one should lie to save another person An ethical dilemma Must do the lesser of two evils If then we say “lying is ethical” can we justify that ethical mandate? Of course not, then by logic we must conclude that “Not lying is ethical” since we can not say that both lying and not lying are ethical actions.
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5  John Rawls and the  “Veil of Ignorance” Behind the veil are rational human beings that value their own good. Rich or poor, talented or untalented, white or black, male or female, upper or lower class, educated or uneducated, handicapped or healthy. The act applies to you but you do not know what role you will have as you step from behind the veil A fair and just solution is one that ALL behind the veil would find agreeable Matches all 3 of Kant’s categorical imperatives
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Prepared by T.K. Herskowitz #6 Applying Moral Reasoning Consequences, Duties, Rights, or justice – Which is correct? Philosophers and practitioners disagree about the ultimate foundation for ethics, or even if there is one. Must we use only one approach? Different situations may be best approached by different methods
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Prepared by T.K. Herskowitz #7 Case Application Payday loans
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Prepared by T.K. Herskowitz #8 Applying Moral Reasoning All ethical theories start from widely accepted moral beliefs about what is right or wrong. Use that knowledge For most situations either method (deontology or Utilitarian), if carefully, thoroughly and conscientiously applied, will produce the same moral conclusion. Nevertheless, before using a utilitarian analysis, we should also ask if anyone’s rights are being threatened or violated or whether there is an issue of justice involved.
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I’m Confused What do I use A good example of what I am looking for can be found on pages 356-361 in the De George text. De George has a strong personal belief that discrimination is ethically wrong. But he supports that personal belief by analyzing how discriminatory actions are unethical from a utilitarian, Kantian or Rawlsian approach. The ethical analysis does not change his ethical beliefs (because discrimination is unethical) but it supports why he believes it is unethical and presents arguments that can engage discussion rather than merely asserting "I am the teacher therefore I am right." #9
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10 REVIEW What are RIGHTS?
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Ethics_Class_3_Virtue_and_Character[1] - Ethics Virtue and...

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