Great Gatsby Fitzgeralds Criticism of The

Great Gatsby Fitzgeralds Criticism of The - Great Gatsby:...

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Great Gatsby: Fitzgerald's Criticism of The American Dream The American Dream, as it arose in the Colonial period and developed in the nineteenth century, was based on the assumption that each person, no matter what his origins, could succeed in life on the sole basis of his or her own skill and effort. The dream was embodied in the ideal of the self-made man, just as it was embodied in Fitzgerald's own family by his grandfather, P. F. McQuillan. Fitzgerald's novel takes its place among other novels whose insights into the nature of the American dream have not affected the artistic form of the novel itself. The Great Gatsby serves as Fitzgerald's critique of the American dream. The Great Gatsby embodies a criticism of America and the American experience, more radical than any other author has attempted. The theme of the novel is the destruction of the American dream during the 1920s, a period when the vulgar pursuit of material happiness has corrupted the old values that gave substance to the dream. The characters are Midwesterners who have come
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This note was uploaded on 07/24/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Menon during the Summer '06 term at Georgia State University, Atlanta.

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Great Gatsby Fitzgeralds Criticism of The - Great Gatsby:...

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