Micropropagation 2009

Micropropagation 2009 - Micropropagation the art and...

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Unformatted text preview: Micropropagation the art and science of multiplying plants in vitro . Plant Propagation by Tissue Culture GJ DeKlerk, EF George, MA Hall (eds) 3 rd Edition, 2008 Springer http://www.springerlink.com/content/n5tm3 0/? p=2d1b86aedb5a437f987c7bd63962bbc8& pi=0 Rapid clonal in vitro propagation of plants: from cells, tissues or organs cultured aseptically on defined media contained in culture vessels maintained under controlled conditions of light and temperature Toward Commercial Micropropagation 1950s Morel & Martin 1952 Meristem-tip culture for disease elimination Morel 1960 Disease eradication Wimber 1963 & in vitro production of orchids Commercialization of Micropropagation 1970s & 1980s Murashige 1974 Broad commercial application Clone Genetically identical assemblage of individuals propagated entirely by vegetative means from a single plant. Conventional Propagation Cuttings Budding, grafting Layering Conventional Propagation Advantages Equipment costs minimal Little experience or technical expertise needed Inexpensive Specialized techniques for growth control (e.g. grafting onto dwarfing rootstocks) Micropropagation Advantages From one to many propagules rapidly Multiplication in controlled lab conditions Continuous propagation year round Potential for disease-free propagules Inexpensive per plant once established Micropropagation Advantages Precise crop production scheduling Reduce stock plant space Long-term germplasm storage Production of difficult-to-propagate species Micropropagation Disadvantages Specialized equipment/facilities required More technical expertise required Protocols not optimized for all species Plants produced may not fit industry standards Relatively expensive to set up? Micropropagation...
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Micropropagation 2009 - Micropropagation the art and...

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