Paper30-Prep-prop-PEG-HEMA-morphology-Macromol-res-14(3)-394-99-Son-et-al(2006)

Paper30-Prep-prop-PEG-HEMA-morphology-Macromol-res-14(3)-394-99-Son-et-al(2006)

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*Corresponding Author. E-mail: kimjh@skku.edu 394 Macromolecular Research, Vol. 14, No. 3, pp 394-399 (2006) Notes Preparation and Properties of PEG-Modified PHEMA Hydrogel and the Morphological Effect Young-Kyo Son, Young Pil Jung, and Ji-Heung Kim* Department of Chemical Engineering, Polymer Technology Institute, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi 440-746, Korea Dong June Chung Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi 440-746, Korea Received March 29, 2006; Revised May 15, 2006 Introduction Hydrogels are highly biocompatible on account of their low surface tension, their similar hydrodynamic properties to those of natural biological gels and tissues, and their min- imal mechanical irritation in the soft and rubbery state. Cur- rently, a wide variety of clinically important hydrogels are being employed as short and long term materials in kidney dialyzers, blood oxygenators, heart valves, vascular grafts, contact lenses, etc. Increasing interest has been devoted to the preparation and novel application of polymeric hydro- gels based on poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) in a variety of medical and biological applications. 1-4 PHEMA is one of the most well-studied synthetic hydrogel polymers. It is nontoxic, biocompatible, swells but does not dissolve in aqueous media, and meets the nutritional and biological requirements of cells. By the bulk polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), a glassy and trans- parent polymer is produced, which is hard like poly(methyl methacrylate). When immersed in water, PHEMA swells and becomes soft and flexible. Although it allows the trans- fer of swelling agents and some low molecular weight sol- utes, this kind of PHEMA is considered non-porous. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the use of scaffolds for tissue and organ reconstruction and substitu- tion. 5 Hydrogel polymers are particularly appealing candi- dates for the design of highly functional tissue engineering scaffolds and also as supports for delivery of bioactive agents (drugs) either locally or systemically. 2,6 In both broad application areas, the rate of transport of both small and large molecules, and indeed cells, through the polymer net- work, critically determines their efficacy. The cell-scaffold interaction is an important factor in organ regeneration, and is influenced by their structures particularly by the pore size. 7,8 Porosity can be controlled by a number of methods, including solvent casting/particulate-leaching, phase separation, freeze- drying, and gas-forming. PEG has a wide range of beneficial properties for biomed- ical applications, including low toxicity and non-thrombo- genic. 2,9,10
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Paper30-Prep-prop-PEG-HEMA-morphology-Macromol-res-14(3)-394-99-Son-et-al(2006)

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