Example_Better_Dispenser_Final Report

Example_Better_Dispenser_Final Report - BETTER DISPENSER...

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BETTER DISPENSER Group 3:
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Part I: Problem Definition With over 100 different lotion manufacturers in the United States, and the average American purchasing anywhere from 6-12 bottles of lotion a year, it is no surprise that over 1 million bottles of lotion are sold on a yearly basis. This news is wonderful for lotion manufacturers because it clearly illustrates the demand that exists for their product. Many Americans are either blind to, or have become complaisant with, the fact that current lotion packaging technology eliminates the possibility of using ALL the lotion contained. The current bottle designs could be a deliberate attempt on the part of the lotion manufacturers to force individuals to prematurely dispose of non-empty bottles of lotion. This would require more frequent lotion purchases. Whether or not the bottles are the result of unethical business practices or a faulty design concept, the inability to easily access all bottle contents is an issue. The popular pump-bottle design that is currently being employed facilitates lotion extraction. Unfortunately, this technology also makes it inherently impossible to obtain lotion that is out of reach of the opening of the pump tube. Residual lotion can be found either stuck to the side of the bottle or stuck to the pump tube. The thicker and more viscous the lotion, the worse this problem becomes. As a result of this inevitability, many individuals are forced to remove the pump tube and look for additional ways to obtain the constituents of the bottle. Some alternative methods for accessing residual
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lotion include, tapping the bottom of the bottle erratically, or inserting fingers into the miniature opening at the top of the bottle. Both makeshift attempts can result in unwanted injury to ones fingers and palms. Depending on the value of the lotion itself, some have even considered cutting the bottle open in order to gain free access to its inner walls. Accessing a product that has already been paid for should not be this difficult. The goal of this project is to come up with a new design concept for a lotion bottle that provides for easy access to ALL lotion contained within. As stated before, the types of lotion containers that are currently available include cup-style containers, tube containers, squeeze containers and pump-bottle containers. These containers come in disposable or non-disposable types. Cup-style containers allow for maximum lotion extraction because of its wide opening and shallow depth. Tube containers also allow for maximum lotion extraction because the contents are able to be squeezed out in the same manner as toothpaste. Squeeze bottles, on the other hand, have the same limitations as pump bottles because the lotion contained is extracted via a squeezing mechanism. The major difference between a squeeze bottle and a tube container is the pliability of the container used. A tube container is made from a material with minimal stiffness that easily deforms under pressure. A squeeze bottle is made of a
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Example_Better_Dispenser_Final Report - BETTER DISPENSER...

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