Unit 3, chap 16 - Liquids and Solids Chapter 16...

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Unformatted text preview: Liquids and Solids Chapter 16 Intermolecular Forces Intra molecular forces are the forces within molecules and formula units Covalent and ionic bonds are intramolecular Inter molecular forces are the forces between molecules and formula units Much weaker than intramolecular bonds Responsible for changes of state The molecule states in tact during changes of state Dipole-dipole Forces Molecules with a dipole moment will line up in a way that minimizes repulsion and maximizes attraction Usually about 1% as strong as covalent or ionic bonds Dipole-dipole forces rapidly become weaker as the distance between dipoles increases Hydrogen bonding Hydrogen bonding is an unusually strong example of a dipole-dipole force Occurs when H is bound to a highly electronegative atom (N, O, or F) Very polar bonds combined with the small size of H account for the strength of H-bonding London Dispersion Forces Relatively weak forces called London dispersion forces exist among nonpolar molecules and the noble gases Caused by instantaneous and induced dipoles A momentary nonsymmetrical electron distribution in one molecule can cause a similar dipole in a neighboring molecule Also called Van der Waals Forces Much weaker compared to dipole-dipole forces London Dispersion Forces...
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Unit 3, chap 16 - Liquids and Solids Chapter 16...

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