Components and Generative Programming

Components and Generative Programming - Term paper reference

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Krzysztof Czarnecki’ and Ulrich W. Eisenecke? ‘DaimlerChrysler AG Research and Technology, Ulm, Germany czarnecki @ acm.org *University of Applied Sciences Heidelberg, Germany ulrich.eisenecker@t-online.de Abstract. This paper is about a paradigm shift from the current practice of manually searching for and adapting components and their manual assembly to Generative Programming, which is the automatic selection and assembly of components on demand. First, we argue that the current 00 technology does not support reuse and configurability in an effective way. Then we show how a system family approach can aid in defining reusable components. Finally, we describe how automate the assembly of components based on configuration knowledge. We compare this paradigm shift to the introduction of interchangeable parts and automated assembly lines in the automobile industry. We also illustrate the steps necessary to develop a product line using a simple example of a car product line. We present the feature model of the product line, develop a layered architecture for it, and automate the assembly of the components using a generator. We also discuss some design issues, applicability of the approach, and future development. 1 From Handcrafting to an Automated Assembly Line This paper is about a paradigm shift from the current practice of manually searching for and adapting components and their manual assembly to Generative Programming, which is the automatic selection and assembly of components on demand. This paradigm shift takes two steps. First, we need to move our focus from engineering single systems to engineering families of systems-this will allow us to come up with the “right” implementation components. Second, we can automate the assembly of the implementation components using generators. Let us explain this idea using a metaphor: Suppose that you are buying a car and instead of getting a read-to-use car, you get all the parts necessary to assemble the car yourself. Actually, not quite. Some of the parts are not a one-hundred-percent fit and you have to do some cutting and filing to make them fit (i.e. adapt them). This is the current practice in component-based software engineering. Brad Cox compares this situation to the one at the brink of the industrial revolution, when it took 25 years of unsuccessful attempts, such as Ely Whitney’s pioneering effort, until John Hall finally succeeded to manufacture muskets from interchangeable parts in 1822 (see [Cox90, Wi1971). Then it took several decades before this groundbreaking idea of mass- manufacturing from interchangeable parts spread to other sectors. Even if you use a library of designed-to-fit, elementary components (such as the C++ Standard Template Library [MS96]), you still have to assemble them manually and
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This document was uploaded on 07/25/2011.

Page1 / 18

Components and Generative Programming - Term paper reference

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online