analysisofwearyblues - From an analysis of The Weary Blues...

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From an analysis of “The Weary Blues” By Steven C. Tracy Clearly in this poem the blues unite the speaker and the performer in some way. There is an immediate implied relationship between the two because of the ambiguous syntax. The "droning" and "rocking" can refer either to the "I" or to the "Negro," immediately suggesting that the music invites, even requires, the participation of the speaker. Further, the words suggest that the speaker's poem is a "drowsy syncopated tune" as well, connecting speaker and performer even further by having them working in the same tradition. The performer remains anonymous, unlike Bessie Smith's Jazzbo Brown, because he is not a famous, celebrated performer; he is one of the main practitioners living the unglamorous life that is far more common than the kinds of lives the most successful blues stars lived. His "drowsy syncopated tune," which at once implies both rest and activity (a tune with shifting accents), signals the tension between the romantic
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This note was uploaded on 07/25/2011 for the course ACCT 200 taught by Professor Minliu during the Spring '11 term at Universidad Europea de Madrid.

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analysisofwearyblues - From an analysis of The Weary Blues...

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