Kirk1 - The Kirkpatrick Model of Training Evaluation...

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The Kirkpatrick Model of Training Evaluation Reading: Kirkpatrick, pages 1-66 and 71-86. Donald Kirkpartick has developed a very popular evaluation model that has been used since the late 1950s by the training community. The focus is on measuring four kinds of outcomes that should result from a highly effective training program. Kirkpatrick’s model includes four levels or steps of outcome evaluation: Level 1 Evaluation—Reaction Level 2 Evaluation—Learning Level 3 Evaluation—Behavior Level 4 Evaluation—Results I will discuss each of these steps in some detail, including how to design these evaluations. Level 1—Reaction Here your goal is to measure participants’ reactions to the training program. You should measure their reactions immediately after the program. Level one evaluation should not just include reactions toward the overall program (e.g., Did you like the program?); it should also include measurement of participants’ reactions or attitudes toward specific components of the program, such as the instructor, the topics, the presentation style, the schedule, audiovisuals, etc. Furthermore, each of these components can be further broken down into sub-components for evaluation (e.g., you
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can ask participants to evaluate specific characteristics of the instructor, the presentation, etc.). In short, level one evaluation is far more than just the measurement of overall customer satisfaction. Learning (Level two outcomes) and transfer of learning (Level three outcomes) are unlikely to occur unless participants have positive attitudes toward the training program. Therefore, it is important to determine participants’ reactions to the training program. Also, positive reactions are important because managers are more likely to eliminate unpopular training programs. Finally, the measurement of specific aspects of the training program can provide important information about what aspects of the training program can be improved in the future. Level 1 evaluation relies on the measurement of attitudes, usually through the use of a questionnaire. It is important to include closed-ended items (including rating scales) as well as open-ended items on your questionnaire. Here are two open-ended items that I like: In your view, what were the three most important weaknesses of the program? In your view, what were the three most important strengths of the program? It is important to learn the weaknesses, as well as the strengths, in order to improve a program. Do not be afraid to ask about program weaknesses! When having participants fill out questionnaires, it is best not to have them put their names on the instruments because of the advantages of anonymity over confidentiality. If they do not put
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their names on the instruments, you can assure anonymity and they may be more likely to be more honest in their answers. The level one questionnaires shown in Exhibit 4.3 and 4.4 are
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This note was uploaded on 07/26/2011 for the course EDE 4942 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at University of Florida.

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Kirk1 - The Kirkpatrick Model of Training Evaluation...

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