lec2 - 1 Chapter 2 Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed...

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1 Chapter 2 Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed Research This chapter is our introduction to the three research methodology paradigms. A paradigm is a perspective based on a set of assumptions, concepts, and values that are held by a community or researchers. For the most of the 20 th century the quantitative paradigm was dominant. During the 1980s, the qualitative paradigm came of age as an alternative to the quantitative paradigm, and it was often conceptualized as the polar opposite of quantitative research. Finally, although the modern roots of mixed research go back to the late 1950s, I think that it truly became the legitimate third paradigm with the publication of the Handbook of Mixed Methods in Social and Behavioral Research (2003, by Tashakkori and Teddlie). At the same time, mixed research has been conducted by practicing researchers throughout the history of research. Characteristics of the Three Research Paradigms There are currently three major research paradigms in education (and in the social and behavioral sciences). They are quantitative research, qualitative research, and mixed research. Here are the definitions of each: Quantitative research – research that relies primarily on the collection of quantitative data. (Note that pure quantitative research will follow all of the paradigm characteristics of quantitative research shown in the left column of Table 2.1.) Qualitative research – research that relies on the collection of qualitative data. (Note that pure qualitative research will follow all of the paradigm characteristics of qualitative research shown in the right column of Table 2.1.) Mixed research – research that involves the mixing of quantitative and qualitative methods or paradigm characteristics. Later in the lecture you will learn about the two major types of mixed research, mixed method and mixed model research. For now, keep in mind that the mixing of quantitative and qualitative research can take many forms. In fact, the possibilities for mixing are almost infinite. Here is Table 2.1 for your convenience and review.
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3 Quantitative Research Methods: Experimental and Nonexperimental Research The basic building blocks of quantitative research are variables . Variables (something that takes on different values or categories) are the opposite of constants (something that cannot vary, such as a single value or category of a variable). Many of the important types of variables used in quantitative research are shown, with examples, in Table 2.2. Here is that table for your review:
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4 In looking at the table note that when we speak of measurement, the most simple classification is between categorical and quantitative variables. As you can see, quantitative variables vary in degree or amount (e.g., annual income) and categorical variables vary in type or kind (e.g., gender). The other set of variables in the table (under the heading role taken by the variable) are
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lec2 - 1 Chapter 2 Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed...

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