lec17 - Chapter 17 Qualitative Data Analysis (Reminder:...

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Chapter 17 Qualitative Data Analysis (Reminder: Don’t forget to utilize the concept maps and study questions as you study this and the other chapters.) The purposes of this chapter are to help you to grasp the language and terminology of qualitative data analysis and to help you understand the process of qualitative data analysis. Interim Analysis Data analysis tends to be an ongoing and iterative (nonlinear) process in qualitative research. The term we use to describe this process is interim analysis (i.e., the cyclical process of collecting and analyzing data during a single research study). Interim analysis continues until the process or topic the researcher is interested in is understood (or until you run out of time and resources!). Memoing Throughout the entire process of qualitative data analysis it is a good idea to engage in memoing (i.e., recording reflective notes about what you are learning from your data). The idea is to write memos to yourself when you have ideas and insights and to include those memos as additional data to be analyzed. Data Entry and Storage Qualitative researchers usually transcribe their data; that is, they type the text (from interviews, observational notes, memos, etc.) into word processing documents. It is these transcriptions that are later analyzed, typically using one of the qualitative data analysis computer programs discussed later in this chapter. Coding and Developing Category Systems This is the next major stage of qualitative data analysis. It is here that you carefully read your transcribed data, line by line, and divide the data into meaningful analytical units (i.e., segmenting the data). When you locate meaningful segments, you code them. Coding is defined as marking the segments of data with symbols, descriptive words, or category names. Again, whenever you find a meaningful segment of text in a transcript, you assign a code or category name to signify that particular segment. You continue this process until you have segmented all of your data and have completed the initial coding. During coding, you must keep a master list (i.e., a list of all the codes that are developed and used in the research study). Then, the codes are reapplied to new segments of data each time an appropriate segment is encountered.
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To experience the process of coding, look at Table 17.2 and then try to segment and code the data. After you are finished, compare your results with the results shown in Table 17.3. These are shown here for your convenience. Don't be surprised if your results are different from mine. As you can see, qualitative research is very much an interpretative process! Now look at how I coded the above data. ..
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Qualitative research is more defensible when multiple coders are used and when high inter- and intra-coder reliability are obtained. Intercoder reliability
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lec17 - Chapter 17 Qualitative Data Analysis (Reminder:...

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