13.StructureofUseCases

13.StructureofUseCases - Use Case Diagrams Use Case...

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1 Use Case Diagrams Use Case Descriptions Use Case Book (Chapter 2) and Visual Modeling Book
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2 Use Case Diagrams… Withdraw Money Transfer Money Simply actors and use cases Can, of course, be much more detailed . Often the relationships are ‘tagged.’
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3 Extending the UML with Stereotyping Know we have ‘Change’ in everything. But very few graphics in UML. Need to communicate special cases: special classes special kinds of use cases… Extend UML for new ‘types’ New types of model elements? We often need customization of models for some projects. Extend UML? No! Ability to stereotype is built in.
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4 Extending the UML with Stereotyping Enter: Stereotyping. Allow us to ‘refine’ / ‘reclassify’ ‘re-specify’ all model elements into a more specialized form rather than create additional symbols! We might specify a Use Case as a <<mission critical>> or class name with the stereotype: <<boundary>> or <<control>> etc. Indicate that the symbol is still a Use Case – but a ‘special one’ perhaps in a ‘special context.’ Most common UML stereotyped element is the class. Stereotyping makes these different model elements!!! (Incidentally, additional icons can be added, if wanted…)
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5 Examples Choices <boundary> (attributes) (methods) Authenticate User <included> A ‘special’ kind of class with special behaviors – a boundary class. A ‘special’ kind of Association – indicates a use case that supports a more fundamental use case – one that is more significant.
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6 Stereotypes in Modeling: Built-ins and User-Defined Stereotypes can be used to ‘increase relevance ’ of model elements, such as use cases in requirements gathering. (Much controversy on ‘extend use cases’ and ‘include use cases’ Much more later: stereotypes: <<includes>> and <<extends>> Use Cases are quite commonly stereotyped A <mission critical> use case ‘may’ be specified in a separate document addressing all stereotypes “Stereotyped element” implies that there are ‘special’ criteria. e.g. A use case that is “mission critical” => must be processed within five seconds. Classes may also very often stereotyped: <boundary>, <control>, <entity> (as found in Analysis Modeling) • A boundary class is a special kind of class that interacts directly with an actor… Any UML modeling element may be stereotyped….
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7 Use Case Template (Be aware there are many many formats. Format is not critical. Content is.) One of many different kind of formats… Will discuss others in next lecture.
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8 Use Cases Use Cases – a great tool that helps us to express interactions between system (application) and actors. We can see the
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This note was uploaded on 07/26/2011 for the course CEN 6016 taught by Professor Sanchez,a during the Spring '08 term at UNF.

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13.StructureofUseCases - Use Case Diagrams Use Case...

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