Sensationalistic approach in journalism - Sensationalistic...

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Sensationalistic approach in journalism--good or bad? Sensationalism is defined by Webster as “the subject matter, language, or style producing or designed to produce startling or thrilling impressions or to excite and please vulgar taste.” Others define it as when something gets extremely talked about or considered too much of a big deal. Media has a common notion of practicing sensationalism through reporting heavily on news that catches the public’s attention. In doing so, there are times when the media neglects its duty to report with accuracy as long as it gives a “good” story. It can report on a politician in a biased manner or report on only one side of an issue (“Sensationalism,” 2010). Reporters have evolved in reporting on drama, action and sensationalism. They satisfy the demands of the viewers rather than report with accuracy, because they believe that what they are reporting are what the viewers want, or in reality, what they themselves want to report to the public (Knightley, 2009). Little do they know that there are still viewers who want to watch news that are free from sensationalism and exaggeration. Viewers believe that such types of news are not accurate enough, and are filled with just rumor, hearsay, and promotional intentions. They also think that sensationalized stories make the report less credible, and make it seem more of an entertainment than news (“Freedom from Sensationalism,” 2000). They often lead television viewers into feeling outraged, disappointed, or even exploited. One television viewer says, “They made it out to be some big ol’ thing and it’s not. They made everybody stay up ‘til the
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