Sensationalism and the Media - Sensationalism and the Media...

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Sensationalism and the Media by Rajesh Talwar The tabloid press in India sells far fewer papers as compared with the broadsheet newspapers and are largely confined to the metros. On the other hand it is no secret that tabloids in England sell more than newspapers and earn more advertising revenue. At the same time over the past few years in India, there has been what can only be called a ‘tabloidisation’ of the national newspapers with major newspapers like the Hindustan Times and The Times of India printing a separate section on the city. This section of the paper is generally flush with photographs of glamorous personalities and is accompanied by a write up that is a mish mash of juicy tidbits and gossip from the filmi, fashion and corporate worlds. It does however remain within a certain code of decency. It can be said therefore that over the last decade or so the national press has become less serious sensing an interest in its younger readership for more lighthearted fare. By introducing lighter fare that accompanies the more serious pages the newspapers have increased their readership and simultaneously kept the tabloids at bay, for the tabloids do not then have anything special to offer. Can we envisage a time in India in the not to distant future when tabloids will overtake the
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Sensationalism and the Media - Sensationalism and the Media...

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