The Juvenile Justice System in the Great State of Kansas

The Juvenile Justice System in the Great State of Kansas -...

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The Juvenile Justice System in the Great State of Kansas By: Jamie Newman
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As I sit down to write this paper on the juvenile justice system in the state of Kansas, all I can think about the daunting task of trying to come up with at least enough information to come up with five pages. Once I started researching, I soon realized that this could be used as an opportunity to educate myself on a field that interests me. Sometimes in our own bubble that we live in we forget that it takes many people doing many different jobs that make this world go round. The Kansas Juvenile Justice Authority does its part to keep the people of this great state safe, all the while changing the lives of our at-risk youth. So where do we begin? As any well written paper would, we will start with the beginning. The Kansas Juvenile Justice Authority (KJJA) began operating on July 1, 1997. This is around the time that the Juvenile Justice Reform started. The reform focuses on the prevention, intervention, and community-based services. The reform believes that a juvenile should only be placed in a juvenile correction facility as a last resort. Youth can rehabilitated and handled in their community. This is the case unless they are chronic or violent offenders and that the safety of the public is in jeopardy. KJJA wants the youth to be served in their community. With this being said, each county or group of cooperating counties are required to be eligible to get state funding for the development, operation, and improvement of the juvenile community corrections. In the KJJA youth can be as young and ten years old and as old as seventeen years old can be judged as juvenile offenders and be ordered into the custody on the Commissioner of Juvenile Justice. The KJJA may keep custody of the juvenile in a correctional facility until they reach the age of twenty-two and half years old. A person can be held in the juvenile justice system as an offender completing a punishment in the community until the age of twenty-three years old. Now that we have custody of juveniles what are we going to do with them?
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The mission of Kansas is “The JJA assists youth to become successful and productive citizens by providing leadership and support to: Prevent youth from becoming involved in the juvenile justice system Provide community supervision for youth who are involved in the juvenile justice system Provide safe, secure, humane and restorative confinement of youth to enhance public safety Promote public safety by holding youth accountable for their behavior, and improve the ability of youth to live productively and responsibly in their communities.” The KJJA has three facilities that they operate. These are juvenile correctional facilities that
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This note was uploaded on 07/26/2011 for the course IDS 401 taught by Professor Tj during the Spring '11 term at Fort Hays.

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The Juvenile Justice System in the Great State of Kansas -...

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