Coyle Chapter 15 PowerPoint Slides

Coyle Chapter 15 PowerPoint Slides - Chapter 15 Managing...

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Chapter 15 Managing Reverse Flows in the Supply Chain Learning Objectives After reading this chapter, you should be able to do the following: Understand why reverse flows in the supply chain were traditionally regarded as being unimportant to the financial success of companies. Appreciate why global supply chains present special challenges for reverse flows. Discuss the reasons for some of the early reverse logistics systems and closed loop supply chains. Understand why there has been a significant increase in the volume of items moving in reverse in supply chains today and list the eight major categories of reverse flows. Appreciate the difference between reverse logistics systems and closed loop supply chains and understand their respective characteristics. Understand the three major forces that drive reverse logistics systems and describe their differences and similarities. Discuss the differences between value streams and waste streams for reverse flows.
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Introduction Traditionally, reverse flows were not viewed as adding value for customers or revenue for the manufacturer or producer. Information and financials (cash) are also an important dimension of reverse logistics and closed loop supply chains. Global supply chains present challenges and opportunities for reverse flows Including green laws.
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Importance and Magnitude of Reserve Flows Transportation companies and warehouses have dealt with returns. Retailers lose 3 to 5% of gross sales to returns accounting for about 4.5% of the cost of logistics. Internet returns are about double the counter sale returns.
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Eight categories of reverse flows: Products that have failed; are unwanted, damaged, or defective; but can be repaired or remanufactured and resold Products that are old, obsolete, or near the end of their shelf life but still have some value for salvage or resale
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This note was uploaded on 07/28/2011 for the course MRKT 4354 taught by Professor Nancyevans during the Summer '11 term at Virginia Tech.

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Coyle Chapter 15 PowerPoint Slides - Chapter 15 Managing...

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