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lecture19_6slides - Statistics 528 - Lecture 19 1...

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Unformatted text preview: Statistics 528 - Lecture 19 1 Statistics 528 - Lecture 19 Prof. Kate Calder 1 Finding Binomial Probabilities Assume X ~ B(n,p), if k <= n then where . Note: a! = a(a-1)(a-2) … 1 and 0! = 1. => This is the binomial formula . k n k p p k n k X P-- & & ¡ ¢ £ £ ¤ ¥ = = ) 1 ( ) ( )! ( ! ! k n k n k n- = & & ¡ ¢ £ £ ¤ ¥ Statistics 528 - Lecture 19 Prof. Kate Calder 2 Example: Free-Throws (Lecture 16) X is the number of shots made in three attempts: x P(X=x) 0.08 1 0.1+0.1+0.1=0.3 2 0.14+0.14+0.14 = 0.42 3 0.2 Statistics 528 - Lecture 19 Prof. Kate Calder 3 X ~ B(3, 0.58) so we can use the binomial formula to get the probability distribution of X. For example, 42 . ) 58 . 1 ( ) 58 . ( 2 3 ) 2 ( 1 2 =- & & ¡ ¢ £ £ ¤ ¥ = = X P Statistics 528 - Lecture 19 Prof. Kate Calder 4 Finding Binomial Probabilities Using Minitab: Imagine that we are interested in knowing the probability that a 0.58 percent shooter makes 10 out 20 free-throws....
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This note was uploaded on 07/26/2011 for the course STA 528 taught by Professor Calder during the Winter '09 term at Ohio State.

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lecture19_6slides - Statistics 528 - Lecture 19 1...

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