John Dewey excerpt

John Dewey excerpt - Persons do not become a society by...

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Persons do not become a society by living in physical proximity, any more than a man ceases to be socially influenced by being so many feet or miles removed from others. A book or a letter may institute a more intimate association between human beings separated thousands of miles from each other than exists between dwellers under the same roof. individuals do not even compose a social group because they all work for a common end. the parts of a machine work with a maximum of cooperativeness for a common result, but they do not form a community. If, however, they were all cognizant of the common end and all interested in it so that they regulated their specific activity in view of it, then they would form a community. But this would involve communication. Each would have to know what the other was about and would have some way of keeping the other informed as to his own purpose and progress. Consensus demands communication. We are thus compelled to recognize that within even the most social group there are many relations which
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