TravisMathenyUnit4ProjectCM410

TravisMathenyUnit4ProjectCM410 - Organizational Culture...

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Organizational Culture 1 Running head: A VIEW OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE Culture Walk: A View of Organizational Culture Travis H Matheny Organizational Communication CM410-01 Kaplan University Professor Dorothy Williams Ph.D. February 3, 2011
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Organizational Culture 2 Culture Walk: A View of Organizational Culture An organizations culture varies as extensively as the products or services it provides. In today's ever changing corporate environment, the cultural make-up of an organization is instrumental in the overall success of the company. Meaning it can have either a positive or negative impact on whether or not the organization is able to achieve its primary objectives (Eisenberg, Goodall, Tretheway, 2010). In this paper I will explore the concept of organizational culture, explain the importance of this concept and discuss the current culture of the organization I am associated with. Although culture is not an easily defined concept, it is generally described as being made up of the values, beliefs, and norms expressed in work practices and behavior. Oftentimes it is this unique mix of values and norms that govern the cultural environment of the organization. Meaning, an organizations culture is not necessarily a predetermined list of values one can find in a carefully worded mission statement or available as an appendix in an annual report. Rather, culture is created by the organization itself (Eisenberg, Goodall, Tretheway, 2010). Some of the most visible expressions of the culture in any organization are referred to as artifacts (Eisenberg, Goodall, Tretheway, 2010). These include the architecture and decor, the clothing people wear, the organizational processes and structures, and the rituals, symbols and celebrations. Other concrete manifestations of culture are found in commonly used language and terminology, as well as logos, brochures, company slogans, as well as status symbols such as cars, window offices, titles, and of course mission statements and priorities. An outsider can often spot these artifacts easily upon entering an organization. However, for insiders, these artifacts tend to just blend into the background (Eisenberg, Goodall, Tretheway, 2010).
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Organizational Culture 3 Examining the cultural environment in which one works can provide valuable insight regarding their organizations true values and norms, which can then be used to advance personal and organizational objectives. Since the culture of an organization operates at both a conscious and unconscious level, often the people who see your culture more clearly are those external to the organization. For this reason, outsiders such as new hires, consultants and vendors tend to observe the cultural environment more objectively than those living inside the culture. Therefore
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TravisMathenyUnit4ProjectCM410 - Organizational Culture...

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