Rhetoric and Stereotypes

Rhetoric and Stereotypes - Rhetoric and Stereotypes...

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Rhetoric and Stereotypes Page 1 Rhetoric and Stereotypes Mindi Barker April 24, 2011 PHI 103 Informal Logic Todd Hughes
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Rhetoric and Stereotypes Page 2 Rhetoric and Stereotypes Stereotypes are generalizations, or assumptions, which people make about the characteristics of all members of a group, based on an image about what people in that group are like. If you assume you know what a person is like, and don't look at each person as an individual, you are likely to make errors in your estimation of a person's character. I will touch on some rhetoric and stereotypes of politicians, tattooed people, feminist and senior citizens. I will share what I gain from research, reading and other materials. Politicians Politicians are very interesting because they often stereotype one another in an attempt to gain a vote or to persuade voting. If you ever watch any political debate you can more than likely see rhetorical analogy which is likening one thing to another thing in order to convey a negative or positive feeling about it (Moore & Parker, 2006, p. 53). You may have an opportunity to see rhetorical definitions as well. Rhetorical definitions are definitions whose purpose is to express or influence attitudes rather than to clarify (Moore & Parker, 2006, p. 53). You will be able to see many of the rhetorical devices being used, such as slanting, stereotyping, and phony outrage. Many politicians use stereotyping rather excessively, especially when engaging in personal attacks. Of course they use spending and taxes in relation to Democrats to stir emotions in Republicans. This would be an attempt to gain an advantage on the Democrats. Depending on the seriousness of the issues and level of frustration, the greater the rhetorical
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Rhetoric and Stereotypes - Rhetoric and Stereotypes...

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