newtoncm

newtoncm - gravitational, electrical or the tension in a...

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Newton’s laws applied to circular motion Case one: Uniform circular motion [UCM] To the ancient Greeks, uniform circular motion was considered the only perfect form of motion. Today we study perfection! In this case the particle moves in a circle of radius r with constant speed , v. In class it is shown that for UCM the acceleration vector for the particle has constant magnitude with a direction that always points to the center of the circle. We call this centripetal (center seeking) or radial acceleration: a r = (v 2 /r) [- r (hat)]. Various forces can give rise to such an acceleration, for example,
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Unformatted text preview: gravitational, electrical or the tension in a string. Specific examples of UCM include: the conical pendulum a banked curve motion in a vertical circle Case two: general circular motion In this case the speed is changing. Therefore, there is a radial acceleration, a r (same as above) and a tangential acceleration , where a t dv/dt and v is the speed . As the name implies, the tangential acceleration points in the direction of the tangent line to the circle. Examples[in class]...
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newtoncm - gravitational, electrical or the tension in a...

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