How are appellate courts different from trial courts

How are appellate courts different from trial courts - How...

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How are appellate courts different from trial courts? How do the functions, roles, and outcomes of appellate courts set the apart from trial courts? Trial courts are when the trial first takes place. The lawyers are presenting their case and showing all the evidence to the judge and/or jury. At most trial courts, a jury is selected to hear the evidence and listen to all witnesses involved in the case. Appellate courts works a little different. The lawyers are not presenting any evidence or witnesses; they are basically making their arguments to the judge whether or not the defendant deserves to go back for another trial if they were found guilty. The judges in an appellate court are only interested in hearing if there are legal reasons as to why the defendant deserves a second trial. Another difference between the appellate court and trial court is there is only one judge hearing the case in a trial court. In most cases trial courts judges makes the final decision over the case. However, during in an appellate court more than one judge can
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How are appellate courts different from trial courts - How...

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