157 - © 2008 Poultry Science Association, Inc. Dietary...

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Unformatted text preview: © 2008 Poultry Science Association, Inc. Dietary Amino Acid Responses of Broiler Chickens 1 W. A. Dozier III,* 2 M. T. Kidd,† and A. Corzo† *USDA, Agriculture Research Service, Poultry Research Unit, PO Box 5367, Mississippi State 39762-5367; and †Department of Poultry Science, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State 39762 Primary Audience: Live Production Managers, Nutritionists SUMMARY In commercial practice, formulating diets to adequate amino acid (AA) minimums is critical to optimize live production and meat yield of broiler chickens. The modern broiler has lower feed intake per unit BW gain and also has the potential to accrete more white meat than the commercial broiler of previous decades. Broilers consuming less feed per unit of gain have led to formulating higher AA density diets in commercial production for improved performance and meat yield. This manuscript reviews current literature in dietary AA density. In addition, it provides estimates of consumption and dietary percentages of critical AA needed to optimize growth and meat yield calculated from published research. Key words: amino acid, broiler, lysine, methionine, nutrient density 2008 J. Appl. Poult. Res. 17:157–167 doi:10.3382/japr.2007-00071 DESCRIPTION OF PROBLEM Within the last 10 yr, demand for breast fil- lets and value-added products has contributed to increasing market weights of broiler chickens. Modern broilers reach their target weights in fewer days than the commercial broiler used in previous years [1, 2]. Fancher [3] reported that genetic selection by primary breeding compa- nies has increased 42-d BW by 0.55 kg/yr during the past decade. With genetic improvements, broilers consume less feed per unit of BW gain [4, 5]. Hence, dietary amino acid ( AA ) needs of the modern broiler should be increased com- pared with AA minimums used with broilers in previous years. 1 Mention of trade names or commercial products in this publication is solely for the purpose of providing specific information and does not imply recommendation or endorsement by the USDA. 2 Corresponding author: bill.dozier@ars.usda.gov Nutritional programs differ in AA density among broiler complexes in the United States [3]. Market weight, product mix, live cost, and genetic strain are factors that may govern AA supplementation. In the United States, 2 diverse nutritional strategies are practiced with regard to AA supplementation: 1) formulating diets to low AA density to minimize feed cost or 2) formulating diets to high AA density to optimize breast meat yield. The former philosophy can limit meat accretion of the modern broiler while not maximizing profits, especially when consid- eration is given to breast meat yield and breast meat prices [6–9]....
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157 - © 2008 Poultry Science Association, Inc. Dietary...

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