A Caribbean Mystery By Agatha Christie

A Caribbean Mystery By Agatha Christie - A A A C C C a a a...

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Unformatted text preview: A A A C C C a a a r r r i i i b b b b b b e e e a a a n n n M M M y y y s s s t t t e e e r r r y y y ……… Agatha Christie 1 MAJOR PALGRAVE TELLS A STORY "TAKE all this business about Kenya," said Major Palgrave. "Lots of chaps gabbing away who know nothing about the place! Now Ispent fourteen years of my life there. Some of the best years of my life, too." Old Miss Marple inclined her head. It was a gentle gesture of courtesy. Whilst Major Palgrave proceeded with the somewhat uninteresting recollections of a lifetime, Miss Marple peacefully pursued her own thoughts. It was a routine with which she was well acquainted. The locale varied. In the past, it had been predominantly India. Majors, Colonels, Lieutenant-Generals&and a familiar series of words: Simla. Bearers. Tigers. Chota Hazri&Tiffin. Khitmagars, and so on. With Major Palgrave the terms were slightly different. Safari. Kikuyu. Elephants. Swahili. But the pattern was essentially the same. An elderly man who needed a listener so that he could, in memory, relive days in which he had been happy. Days when his back had been straight, his eyesight keen, his hearing acute. Some of these talkers had been handsome soldierly old boys, some again had been regrettably unattractive, and Major Palgrave, purple of face, with a glass eye, and the general appearance of a stuffed frog, belonged in the latter category. Miss Marple had bestowed on all of them the same gentle charity. She had sat attentively, inclining her head from time to time in gentle agreement, thinking her own thoughts and enjoying what there was to enjoy: in this case the deep blue of a Caribbean Sea. So kind of dear Raymond&she was thinking gratefully&so really and truly kind . . . Why he should take so much trouble about his old aunt, she really did not know. Conscience, perhaps, family feelings? Or possibly he was truly fond of her . . . She thought, on the whole, that he was fond of her&he always had been&in a slightly exasperated and contemptuous way! Always trying to bring her up to date. Sending her books to read. Modern novels. So difficult&all about such unpleasant people, doing such very odd things and not, apparently, even enjoying them. "Sex" as a word had not been much mentioned in Miss Marple's young days; but there had been plenty of it&not talked about so much&but enjoyed far more than nowadays, or so it seemed to her. Though usually labelled Sin, she couldn't help feeling that that was preferable to what it seemed to be nowadays&a kind of Duty. Her glance strayed for a moment to the book on her lap lying open at page twenty-three which was as far as she had got (and indeed as far as she felt like getting!). "Do you mean that you've had no sexual experience at ALL?" demanded the young man incredulously. "At nineteen? But you must. It's vital." The girl hung her head unhappily, her straight greasy hair fell forward over her face. "I know," she muttered, "I know." He looked at her, stained old jersey, the bare feet, the dirty...
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This note was uploaded on 07/28/2011 for the course LITERATURE 101 taught by Professor Agathachristie during the Spring '11 term at Heritage.

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A Caribbean Mystery By Agatha Christie - A A A C C C a a a...

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