Parker Pyne Investigates By Agatha Christie

Parker Pyne Investigates By Agatha Christie -...

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Unformatted text preview: "I want to know whether or not my husband is poisoning me." Whatever Mr. Parker Pyne had expected, it wasn't this. "That is a very serious accusation to make, Lady Grayle." "Well, I'm not a fool and I wasn't born yesterday. I've had my suspicions for some time. Whenever George goes away, I feel better. My food doesn't disagree with me and I feel a different woman. There must be some reason for that." "Do you want your suspicions proved right or wrong?" "Really, Mr. Pyne!" The lady rose to her feet, quivering with indignation. Mr. Parker Pyne nodded his head gently. "Yes, yes," he said. "But that doesn't answer my question, you know." "The champion deceiver of our time." reNEW YORK TIMES AGATHA CHRISTIE BERKLEY BOOKS, NEW YORK MR. PARKER PYNE, DETECTIVE Contents The Case of the Middle-Aged Wife The Case of the Discontented Soldier The Case of the Distressed Lady The Case of the Discontented Husband The Case of the City Clerk The Case of the Rich Woman Have You Got Everything You Want? The Gate of Baghdad The House at Shiraz The Pearl of Price Death on the Nile The Oracle at Dlphi 'The Case of the 3fiddle-A, qed 'l ife Four grunts, an indignant voice asking why nobody could leave a hat alone, a slammed door, and Mr. Pack-ington had departed to catch the eight-forty-five to the City. Mrs. Packington sat on at the breakfast table. Her face was flushed, her lips were pursed, and the only reason she was not crying was that at the last minute anger had taken the place of grief. "I won't stand it," said Mrs. Packington. "I won't stand it!" She remained for some moments brooding, and then murmured: "The minx. Nasty sly little cat! How George can be such a fool!" Anger faded; grief came back. Tears came into Mrs. Packington's eyes and rolled slowly down her middle-aged cheeks. "It's all very well to say I won't stand it, but what can I do?" Suddenly she felt alone, helpless, utterly forlorn. Slowly she took up the morning paper and read, not for the first time, an advertisement on the front page. 2 Agatha Christie "Absurd!" said Mrs. Packington. "Utterly absurd." Then: "After all, I might just see..." Which explains why at eleven o'clock Mrs. Packing-ton, a little nervous, was being shown into Mr. Parker Pyne's private office. As has been said, Mrs. Packington was nervous, but somehow or other, the mere sight of Mr. Parker Pyne brought a feeling of reassurance. He was large, not to say fat; he had a bald head of noble proportions, strong glasses and little twinkling eyes. "Pray sit down," said Mr. Parker Pyne. "You have come in answer to my advertisement?" he added help-fully. "Yes," gaid Mrs. Packington, and stopped there. "And you are not happy," said Mr. Parker Pyne in a cheerful, matter-of-fact voice. "Very few people are....
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This note was uploaded on 07/28/2011 for the course LITERATURE 101 taught by Professor Agathachristie during the Spring '11 term at Heritage.

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Parker Pyne Investigates By Agatha Christie -...

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