How to Support You Conclusions

How to Support You Conclusions - Business Law 420,...

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Business Law 420, Commercial Law How to Support Your Conclusions or, How to Receive Full Credit for Your Knowledge on Essay Exams 1. Recognize the difference between a conclusion and a fact. A fact is, e.g., that Bob holds three yard sales each year. A fact is, e.g., that a car has a new engine. A “fact” is defined in the text’s glossary as “an event that took place or a thing that exists”. It is not a matter of opinion; it is objectively determinable. On the other hand, a conclusion is a judgment that you reach. For example, it is a conclusion whether holding three yard sales a year makes Bob a “merchant” under the UCC. 2. If it is important (under some other rule) whether Bob is a merchant, then the first thing to do is to explain why Bob’s status as a merchant or non-merchant is relevant. To do this you must state the content of the other rule. Every rule has certain requirements. For example, the UCC Firm Offer Rule (2-205) requires that a seller promising to keep an offer open must be (1) a merchant, (2) give the buyer a written promise to keep the offer open, and (3) the writing must be signed by the merchant. If you need use the Firm Offer Rule in your answer, first state its content/requirements, as above.
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This note was uploaded on 07/29/2011 for the course ACCT 351B taught by Professor Inama during the Spring '11 term at Golden Gate.

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How to Support You Conclusions - Business Law 420,...

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