Ch. 10 HW Assignments 10-10

Ch. 10 HW Assignments 10-10 - Trevor Grabhorn Period 2 Ch...

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Trevor Grabhorn 10-25-10 Period 2 Ch. 10 Identifications Henry Clay and the American System- was a nineteenth-century American statesman and orator who represented Kentucky in both the Senate and the House of Representatives, where he served as Speaker. He also served as Secretary of State from 1825 to 1829. He was the foremost proponent of the American System, fighting for an increase in tariffs to foster industry in the United States, the use of federal funding to build and maintain infrastructure, and a strong national bank. He opposed the annexation of Texas, fearing it would inject the slavery issue into politics. Clay also opposed the Mexican-American War and the "Manifest Destiny" policy of Democrats, which cost him votes in the close 1844 election. Dubbed the "Great Compromiser," he brokered important compromises during the Nullification Crisis and on the slavery issue, especially in 1820 and 1850, during which he was part of the "Great Triumvirate" or "Immortal Trio," along with his colleagues Daniel Webster and John C. Calhoun. Second American party system- The Second Party System is a term of periodization used by historians and political scientists to name the political party system existing in the United States from about 1828 to 1854. The system was characterized by rapidly rising levels of voter interest beginning in 1828, as demonstrated by election day turnout, rallies, partisan newspapers, and a high degree of personal loyalty to party. Spoils system- (also known as a patronage system) is a practice where a political party, after winning an election, gives government jobs to its voters as a reward for working toward victory, and as an incentive to keep working for the party—as opposed to a system of awarding offices on the basis of some measure of merit independent of political activity. Tariff of Abominations," 1828- was a protective tariff passed by the Congress of the United States on May 19, 1828 designed to protect industry in the northern United States. It was labeled the Tariff of Abominations by its southern detractors because of the effects it had on the antebellum Southern economy and led to the Nullification Crisis. John C. Calhoun and the South Carolina Exposition and Protest- also known as Calhoun's Exposition , was written in 1828 by John C. Calhoun, the Vice President of the United States under Andrew Jackson. Calhoun did not formally state his authorship at the time, though it was known.The document was a protest against the Tariff of 1828, also known as the Tariff of Abominations. The document stated that if the tariff was not repealed, South Carolina would secede. It stated also Calhoun's Doctrine of nullification, i.e., the idea that a state has the right to reject federal law, first introduced by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison in their Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions. Compromise of 1833-
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This note was uploaded on 07/29/2011 for the course ECON 101 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '10 term at Baltimore City.

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Ch. 10 HW Assignments 10-10 - Trevor Grabhorn Period 2 Ch...

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