sale kidneys

Sale kidneys - Subject Code ENG112 Legalization of Kidney Sales When organ donations are discussed many people think of the small pink stickers

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Legalization of Kidney Sales When organ donations are discussed, many people think of the small pink stickers they put on their driver’s license declaring them a donor. People who are familiar with the little pink stickers are often familiar with the organ donations occurring postmortem. Unfortunately, even with approximately half the United States population choosing to donate cadaveric organs, statistics have shown there is still a critical shortage of organs for transplant (Hansen 155). Some of these organs, primarily kidneys, lobes of livers, and certain types of tissues, could be removed from a living donor. When it comes to live organ donations, various views are held regarding the restrictions that should be placed, or if they should be legal at all. The problem is many organs are needed and not enough people are willing to donate—live or cadaveric. Kidneys are the most demanded of all organ transplants, as well as the least available. “Kidneys have been in great demand for transplantation because the success rates for them have been the highest of all organs” (Cohen 48). According to Brian Hansen from The CQ Researcher , patients who have received a kidney from a living donor have a 98% one-year survival rate, compared to the 65% one-year survival rate of patients undergoing a lung transplant (Hansen, 164). In a sense, the accomplishments of the medical industry have backfired: now that kidney transplants are so successful, kidneys are more in demand than any other organ. It is likely that fewer people would desire kidney transplants if the operation were more life threatening. With an understanding of the shortage of kidneys, we now need a solution for the problem. There are two major proposals for increasing the number of available kidneys, both facing opposition. One suggestion is to increase funding to research xenotransplantation—transplanting organs from animals into humans. Some pigs and goats have been bred to develop the correct size organs to transplant into humans; however, potentially transferable diseases have prevented xenotransplantation from becoming largely popular, as well as opposition from animal-rights activists (Hansen 161). Another proposed solution for the organ shortage is to remove the ban on selling human body parts, or allow some sort of compensation for donors. Selling organs has become a much-disputed subject in bioethics and medicine and there are several arguments for each side of the debate. - 1 -
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/29/2011 for the course BUS 444 taught by Professor Lynn during the Spring '11 term at Keuka.

Page1 / 5

Sale kidneys - Subject Code ENG112 Legalization of Kidney Sales When organ donations are discussed many people think of the small pink stickers

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online