History Final - An American Reflection 1 An American...

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An American Reflection 1 An American Reflection William Edwards HIS/135 Lou LaGrande
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An American Reflection 2 An American Reflection America has always been called the big melting pot. What does this mean? It means that throughout history we have taken in and absorbed the different cultures of other countries. For instance we have a huge immigrant nation of Chinese people. These Chinese-American people not only brought their people to America, but their ideals, traditions, and even the ever popular Chinese food. Of course throughout time things become “Americanized” such as Chinese food. There is a big difference is what you get at your local Chinese restaurant versus what you would get in a home in China. The “Americanization” of anything that enters our country isn’t just contained here at home. For example take democracy; we as a people believe that democracy is the only way to run a country. The people should have a voice and should be able to express that voice in a reasonable way. To me this is the reason for things like the Vietnam War, the Cold War, even all the way to today with the War in Iraq. We are trying to put our ideals into motion to make the world fit in our eyes, and though it has been a struggle all these years to do so, we seem to be influencing many nations to stand up and fight for their rights and change the world. These changes have been a part of America from the beginning, and these changes have affected every aspect of our lives from the music we listen to, to the type of television we watch. The 1950’s: Televisions in every home To see a television in some ones home in the 1950’s was indeed a true gift to many. Televisions were not what they are today. They were small and offered very little
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An American Reflection 3 in the way of entertainment; merely because the quality of television at this time was low. At this time shows that were being watch were broadcast from the same city, and many times the picture was so bad that the people on the screen appeared as a shadows and were mostly unrecognizable. (Marcus & Spadoni, US Television's Golden Age - Part 1) Once World War II began broadcasting all but ceased around the country and it wasn’t until after the war that television really made its big splash around the country. During the suspension of broadcasting and manufacturing that World War II caused people were working tirelessly to improve what television was. There were new technologies created during the war that improved television viewing and created the all powerful networks that were working towards national advancements in broadcasting. After the war the economy was in the “big boom” stage and people had the money needed to purchase the almighty television set. People of this time had no idea what television would become. To them it was simply another more advanced form of communication, and a way to stay abreast of information throughout the nation and even the world. Of course big businesses of this time figured that with homes across the
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This note was uploaded on 07/30/2011 for the course HIS 135 taught by Professor Runyon during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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History Final - An American Reflection 1 An American...

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