Bluman 5th_Chapter 8 HW Soln for my class

Bluman 5th_Chapter 8 HW Soln for my class - Section 8-2 Pg....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Section 8-2 Pg. 420 Exercises 5, 6, 7, 15, 19, 20, 21, 25 5. Health Care Expenses The mean annual expenditure per 25- to 34-year-old consumer for health care is $1468. This includes health insurance, medical services, and drugs and medical supplies. Students at a large university took a survey, and it was found that for a sample of 60 students, the mean health care expense was $1520, and the population standard deviation is $198. Is there sufficient evidence at 0.01 α = to conclude that their health care expenditure differs from the national average of $1468? Is the conclusion different at 0.05 = ? 0 1 : 1468 : 1468 (claim) (a two-tailed test) 60 5120 198 0.01 . . 0.01/ 2 0.005, 1 0.005 0.995, then look upin thebodyof TableE 2.58 5120 1468 : 2.03 198 60 CV H H n X s C V z X test value z s n μ = = = = = = - = = - - = = = Do not reject at 0.01 = . There is not enough evidence to support the claim that average expenditure differs from $1468. If 0.05 = , C.V=1.96. Therefore reject at 0.05 = . 6. Peanut Production in Virginia. The average production of peanuts in the state of Virginia is 3000 pounds per acre. A new plan food has been developed and is tested on 60 individual plots of land. The mean yield with the new plant food is 3120 pounds of peanuts per acre with a standard deviation of 578 pounds. At α= 0.05, can one conclude that the average production has increased? 0 1 : 3000 : 3000 (claim) (a right-tailed test) 60 3120 578 0.05 . . 1 0.05 0.95 1.65 3120 3000 : 1.61 578 60 CV H H n X s C V thenlook upinthebody of Table E z X test value z s n = = = = - = = - - = = = Since the test value does not fall within the critical region, we don’t reject the null hypothesis. Therefore, there is not enough evidence to support the claim that the average production of peanuts in the state of Virginia has increased. 7. Heights of 1-Year-Olds The average 1-year-old (both genders) is 29 inches tall. A random sample of 30 one-year-olds in a large day-care franchise resulted in the following heights. At 0.05 = , can it be concluded that the average height differs from 29 inches? 25 32 35 25 30 26.5 26 25.5 29.5 32
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
30 28.5 30 32 28 31.5 29 29.5 30 34 29 32 27 28 33 28 27 32 29 29.5 0 1 : 29 : 29 (claim) (a two- tailed test) 30 29.45 2.61 0.05 . . 1.96 29.45 29 : 0.944 2.61 30 CV H H n X s C V z X test value z s n μ α = = = = = = ± - - = = = Do not reject the null hypothesis. There is enough evidence to reject the claim that the average height differs from 29 inches. 15) State whether the null hypothesis should be rejected on the basis of the given P-value. a) P-value= 0.258, α=0.05, one tailed test If P-value , reject the null hypothesis. Since 0.258 > 0.05, do not reject
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 11

Bluman 5th_Chapter 8 HW Soln for my class - Section 8-2 Pg....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online