UASTAT141Ch20 - Ch. 20 - Hypotheses and Test Procedures...

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Ch. 20 - Hypotheses and Test Procedures Def’n: A null hypothesis is a claim about a population parameter that is assumed to be true until it is declared false. An alternative hypothesis is a claim about a population parameter that will be true if the null hypothesis is false. In carrying out a test of H 0 vs. H A , the hypothesis H 0 is “rejected” in favour of H A only if sample evidence strongly suggests that H 0 is false. If the sample does not contain such evidence, H 0 is “not rejected” or you “fail to reject” it. NEVER “accept” H 0 or H A …for different reasons. e.g. H 0 : μ = 2.8 H A : μ 2.8 pop’n characteristic hypothesized value or “claim” Def’n: A two-tailed test has “rejection regions” in both tails. A one-tailed test has a “rejection region” in one tail. A lower-tailed test has the “rejection region” in the left tail. An upper-tailed test has the “rejection region” in the right tail. e.g. a) H 0 : μ = 15 H A : μ = 15 Æ INCORRECT b) H 0 : μ = 123 H A : μ = 125 Æ INCORRECT c) H 0 : μ = 123 H A : μ < 123 Æ CORRECT d) H 0 : p = 0.4 H A : p > 0.6 Æ INCORRECT e) H 0 : p = 1.5 H A : p > 1.5 Æ INCORRECT f) H 0 : p ˆ = 0.1 H A : p ˆ 0.1 Æ INCORRECT Two-Tailed Test Lower-Tailed Test Upper-Tailed Test Sign for H 0 = = or = or Sign for H A < > “Rejection region”
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This note was uploaded on 07/31/2011 for the course STAT 141 taught by Professor Paulcartledge during the Winter '10 term at University of Alberta.

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UASTAT141Ch20 - Ch. 20 - Hypotheses and Test Procedures...

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