EIA lecture_identifying category.pdf - Environmental impact assessment G U I D E LI N E S FO R FAO FI E LD PR OJ ECTS Environmental impact assessment G

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Unformatted text preview: Environmental impact assessment G U I D E LI N E S FO R FAO FI E LD PR OJ ECTS Environmental impact assessment G U I D E LI N E S FO R FAO FI E LD PR OJ ECTS The designations employed and the presentation of material in this information product do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) concerning the legal or development status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. The mention of specific companies or products of manufacturers, whether or not these have been patented, does not imply that these have been endorsed or recommended by FAO in preference to others of a similar nature that are not mentioned. The views expressed in this information product are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of FAO. ISBN 978-92-5-107276-9 All rights reserved. FAO encourages the reproduction and dissemination of material in this information product. Non-commercial uses will be authorized free of charge, upon request. Reproduction for resale or other commercial purposes, including educational purposes, may incur fees. Applications for permission to reproduce or disseminate FAO copyright materials, and all queries concerning rights and licences, should be addressed by e-mail to [email protected] or to the Chief, Publishing Policy and Support Branch, Office of Knowledge Exchange, Research and Extension, FAO, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla, 00153 Rome, Italy. © FAO 2012 Food and agriculture organization of the united nations Rome, 2011 Environmental impact assessment G U I D E LI N E S FO R FAO FI E LD PR OJ ECTS The designations employed and the presentation of material in this information product do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) concerning the legal or development status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. The mention of specific companies or products of manufacturers, whether or not these have been patented, does not imply that these have been endorsed or recommended by FAO in preference to others of a similar nature that are not mentioned. The views expressed in this information product are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of FAO. ISBN 978-92-5-107276-9 All rights reserved. FAO encourages the reproduction and dissemination of material in this information product. Non-commercial uses will be authorized free of charge, upon request. Reproduction for resale or other commercial purposes, including educational purposes, may incur fees. Applications for permission to reproduce or disseminate FAO copyright materials, and all queries concerning rights and licences, should be addressed by e-mail to [email protected] or to the Chief, Publishing Policy and Support Branch, Office of Knowledge Exchange, Research and Extension, FAO, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla, 00153 Rome, Italy. © FAO 2012 Food and agriculture organization of the united nations Rome, 2011 ii E N V I R O N M E N TA L I M PA C T A S S E S S M E N T G U I D E LI N E S FO R FAO FI E LD PR OJ ECTS table of CONTENTS Acronyms Acronyms iII ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Iv CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 Purpose 1 1.2 Operational context 2 1.3 Policy context 2 CHAPTER 2: THE EIA PROCESS 4 2.1 Overview 4 ANNEX 2: SAMPLE FORMS 27 Environmental and Social Review Form 27 BH Budget holder CD Capacity Development Environmental Screening for Category A & B projects CBD Convention on Biological Diversity 28 EA Environmental Analysis Scoping for Category A projects 31 EIA Environmental Impact Assessment EIA-TF Environmental Impact Assessment Task Force EMP Environmental Management Plan ES Economic and Social Development Department ANNEX 3: BASIC POLICY REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD PROJECTS 32 3.1 Agriculture 32 ESRF Environmental and Social Review Form 3.2 Biodiversity 33 FAO Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations 3.3 Fisheries and aquaculture 33 FAOR FAO Representative 3.4 Forestry 34 FBO Farmer-Based Organization 2.2 Environmental Categories 4 3.5 Livestock and animal husbandry 34 IER Initial Environmental Review 2.3 Steps of the EIA Process in FAO 9 3.6 Fertilizers 35 IPNS Integrated Plan Nutrition System 2.4 Roles and responsibilities 13 3.7 Pesticides 35 IPP Indigenous Peoples Plan 2.5 EIA in FAO’s project cycle 14 3.8 Water development 36 IPPC Plant Protection Convention 3.9 Socio-economic dimensions 37 ITR Interdisciplinary Technical Review 3.10 Gender considerations 38 LTO Lead Technical Officer LTU Lead Technical Unit M&E Monitoring and Evaluation MDT Multi-disciplinary team (FAO Regional/Subregional representations) NRC Environment, Climate Change and Bioenergy Division OEKC Knowledge and Capacity for Development PAC Project Appraisal Committee PCR Polymerase Chain Reaction PPRC Programme and Project Review Committee PTF Project Task Force RBM Results-Based Management SPD Standard Project Document TCDM Field Programme Coordination and Results-Based Monitoring WOCAT World Overview of Conservation Approaches and Technologies CHAPTER 3: EIA REPORTS 17 3.1 Category A projects (significant impacts) 17 3.2 Category B projects (less significant impacts) 17 3.3 Category C projects (minimal or no adverse impacts) 18 SOURCES AND LINKS 19 ANNEX 1: GOVERNING PRINCIPLES 21 ANNEX 4: ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW IN THE FAO PROJECT CYCLE 39 ANNEX 5: OUTLINE FOR THE CATEGORY A EIA REPORT 41 ANNEX 6: AN INITIAL CAPACITY ASSESSMENT AS PART OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCOPING (if required) 43 AMENDMENTS TO THE GUIDELINES 44 iii ii E N V I R O N M E N TA L I M PA C T A S S E S S M E N T G U I D E LI N E S FO R FAO FI E LD PR OJ ECTS table of CONTENTS Acronyms Acronyms iII ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Iv CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 Purpose 1 1.2 Operational context 2 1.3 Policy context 2 CHAPTER 2: THE EIA PROCESS 4 2.1 Overview 4 ANNEX 2: SAMPLE FORMS 27 Environmental and Social Review Form 27 BH Budget holder CD Capacity Development Environmental Screening for Category A & B projects CBD Convention on Biological Diversity 28 EA Environmental Analysis Scoping for Category A projects 31 EIA Environmental Impact Assessment EIA-TF Environmental Impact Assessment Task Force EMP Environmental Management Plan ES Economic and Social Development Department ANNEX 3: BASIC POLICY REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD PROJECTS 32 3.1 Agriculture 32 ESRF Environmental and Social Review Form 3.2 Biodiversity 33 FAO Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations 3.3 Fisheries and aquaculture 33 FAOR FAO Representative 3.4 Forestry 34 FBO Farmer-Based Organization 2.2 Environmental Categories 4 3.5 Livestock and animal husbandry 34 IER Initial Environmental Review 2.3 Steps of the EIA Process in FAO 9 3.6 Fertilizers 35 IPNS Integrated Plan Nutrition System 2.4 Roles and responsibilities 13 3.7 Pesticides 35 IPP Indigenous Peoples Plan 2.5 EIA in FAO’s project cycle 14 3.8 Water development 36 IPPC Plant Protection Convention 3.9 Socio-economic dimensions 37 ITR Interdisciplinary Technical Review 3.10 Gender considerations 38 LTO Lead Technical Officer LTU Lead Technical Unit M&E Monitoring and Evaluation MDT Multi-disciplinary team (FAO Regional/Subregional representations) NRC Environment, Climate Change and Bioenergy Division OEKC Knowledge and Capacity for Development PAC Project Appraisal Committee PCR Polymerase Chain Reaction PPRC Programme and Project Review Committee PTF Project Task Force RBM Results-Based Management SPD Standard Project Document TCDM Field Programme Coordination and Results-Based Monitoring WOCAT World Overview of Conservation Approaches and Technologies CHAPTER 3: EIA REPORTS 17 3.1 Category A projects (significant impacts) 17 3.2 Category B projects (less significant impacts) 17 3.3 Category C projects (minimal or no adverse impacts) 18 SOURCES AND LINKS 19 ANNEX 1: GOVERNING PRINCIPLES 21 ANNEX 4: ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW IN THE FAO PROJECT CYCLE 39 ANNEX 5: OUTLINE FOR THE CATEGORY A EIA REPORT 41 ANNEX 6: AN INITIAL CAPACITY ASSESSMENT AS PART OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCOPING (if required) 43 AMENDMENTS TO THE GUIDELINES 44 iii iv E N V I R O N M E N TA L I M PA C T A S S E S S M E N T G U I D E LI N E S FO R FAO FI E LD PR OJ ECTS CHAPTER 1 Acknowledgements INTRODUCTION 1.1 Purpose An initial version of Environmental Impact The resulting draft EIA Guidelines were brought This publication provides guidelines for all FAO Environmental Assessment may be quite complex, Assessment (EIA) Guidelines for FAO Field to the attention of the Deputy-Director General for units (headquarters departments and offices, especially if applying to broad policies and large Projects was prepared by Jeff Tschirley Operations (DDG-O) and senior managers of the as well as decentralized offices) to undertake sector programmes. Nevertheless most FAO and Patrick Duffy. In early 2009, an Inter- Technical Cooperation (TC) and Natural Resources environmental impact assessments (EIA) of field projects may not require a fully-fledged EIA and Departmental Task Force was constituted for Management and Environment (NR) Departments. projects. The use of these guidelines apply to may be reviewed with limited analytical effort. finalization of corporate guidelines. The Task Based on their feedback, this revised version was all FAO field projects and activities , as further Still, they will need to undergo the screening Force was comprised of Moujahed Achouri, produced under the aegis of Alemneh Dejene specified in the sections below, requiring procedures described under the present Uwe Barg, David Colbert, Linda Collette, Mark (NR) and Diego Recalde (TC). implications to be fully considered early in the guidelines. Where significant potential negative planning process (and all the more so prior to impacts or areas of serious public concern are Davis, Alemneh Dejene, Random Dubois, Pierre 1 Gerber, Irene Hoffmann, Katia Medeiros, Freddy All contributions to this extensive consultative taking final decisions) so as to avoid significant foreseen, a more detailed EIA will need to be Nachtergaele, Diego Recalde and Doris Soto. Work process towards developing corporate EIA negative impacts of environmental or associated prepared, including full technical justifications was also supported by: Olga Abramova, Jan Van Guidelines for FAO Field Projects are gratefully social nature. and public exposure. Amerongen, Aziz Arya, Stefania Battistelli, Sally acknowledged. Berman, Letizia Cuozzo, Kuena Morebotsane, EIA is a tool for decision-makers to identify The present publication covers: Sibyl Nelson and Nicolas Tremblay. potential environmental impacts of proposed projects, to evaluate alternative approaches, and Led by the Technical Cooperation Department to design and incorporate appropriate prevention, (Field Programme Coordination and Results-Based mitigation, management and monitoring Monitoring unit-TCDM) the Task Force reviewed measures. Environmental impact assessment successive drafts, while various ideas and cannot be divorced from social impact of the comments were incorporated by David Colbert. project, hence the latter is considered as a key This process was completed in October 2010. dimension of the EIA process. Examples of these close interactions can be found in the context • guidance to FAO staff on the application of EIA to field projects; • procedures to be used in formulating and screening projects; • FAO’s standards for related documenting and reporting formats; of land tenure and rights, rural livelihoods, and traditional practices. EIA is also expected to help ensuring protection, maintenance and rehabilitation of natural habitats and their functions in the context of FAO’s field projects and policy dialogue with countries. 1 Excluding Telefood and FAO projects with budgets under US$100 000. • roles and responsibilities in conducting EIA to ensure effective implementation. 1 iv E N V I R O N M E N TA L I M PA C T A S S E S S M E N T G U I D E LI N E S FO R FAO FI E LD PR OJ ECTS CHAPTER 1 Acknowledgements INTRODUCTION 1.1 Purpose An initial version of Environmental Impact The resulting draft EIA Guidelines were brought This publication provides guidelines for all FAO Environmental Assessment may be quite complex, Assessment (EIA) Guidelines for FAO Field to the attention of the Deputy-Director General for units (headquarters departments and offices, especially if applying to broad policies and large Projects was prepared by Jeff Tschirley Operations (DDG-O) and senior managers of the as well as decentralized offices) to undertake sector programmes. Nevertheless most FAO and Patrick Duffy. In early 2009, an Inter- Technical Cooperation (TC) and Natural Resources environmental impact assessments (EIA) of field projects may not require a fully-fledged EIA and Departmental Task Force was constituted for Management and Environment (NR) Departments. projects. The use of these guidelines apply to may be reviewed with limited analytical effort. finalization of corporate guidelines. The Task Based on their feedback, this revised version was all FAO field projects and activities , as further Still, they will need to undergo the screening Force was comprised of Moujahed Achouri, produced under the aegis of Alemneh Dejene specified in the sections below, requiring procedures described under the present Uwe Barg, David Colbert, Linda Collette, Mark (NR) and Diego Recalde (TC). implications to be fully considered early in the guidelines. Where significant potential negative planning process (and all the more so prior to impacts or areas of serious public concern are Davis, Alemneh Dejene, Random Dubois, Pierre 1 Gerber, Irene Hoffmann, Katia Medeiros, Freddy All contributions to this extensive consultative taking final decisions) so as to avoid significant foreseen, a more detailed EIA will need to be Nachtergaele, Diego Recalde and Doris Soto. Work process towards developing corporate EIA negative impacts of environmental or associated prepared, including full technical justifications was also supported by: Olga Abramova, Jan Van Guidelines for FAO Field Projects are gratefully social nature. and public exposure. Amerongen, Aziz Arya, Stefania Battistelli, Sally acknowledged. Berman, Letizia Cuozzo, Kuena Morebotsane, EIA is a tool for decision-makers to identify The present publication covers: Sibyl Nelson and Nicolas Tremblay. potential environmental impacts of proposed projects, to evaluate alternative approaches, and Led by the Technical Cooperation Department to design and incorporate appropriate prevention, (Field Programme Coordination and Results-Based mitigation, management and monitoring Monitoring unit-TCDM) the Task Force reviewed measures. Environmental impact assessment successive drafts, while various ideas and cannot be divorced from social impact of the comments were incorporated by David Colbert. project, hence the latter is considered as a key This process was completed in October 2010. dimension of the EIA process. Examples of these close interactions can be found in the context • guidance to FAO staff on the application of EIA to field projects; • procedures to be used in formulating and screening projects; • FAO’s standards for related documenting and reporting formats; of land tenure and rights, rural livelihoods, and traditional practices. EIA is also expected to help ensuring protection, maintenance and rehabilitation of natural habitats and their functions in the context of FAO’s field projects and policy dialogue with countries. 1 Excluding Telefood and FAO projects with budgets under US$100 000. • roles and responsibilities in conducting EIA to ensure effective implementation. 1 2 E N V I R O N M E N TA L I M PA C T A S S E S S M E N T 1.2 Operational context G U I D E LI N E S FO R FAO FI E LD PR OJ ECTS 1.3 Policy context Box 1. FAO’s Vision, Goals, and Strategic Objectives Environmental and related social implications Objectives of project actions should be considered as early as possible in the FAO project cycle. The The EIA guidelines are consistent with FAO`s EIA procedures contemplate a self-assessment Vision, Goals and Strategic Objectives, as set out process followed by an independent review of in the FAO Strategic Framework 2010–2019, the documentation by the Project Appraisal adopted by the Conference in November, Committee (PAC). In monitoring compliance 2009. In effect, environmental protection with the present guidelines, the PAC assures and sustainability principles permeate most the quality of the EIAs. As the main project of the approved Strategic Objectives of the formulator, the Lead Technical Officer (LTO) in Organization. While not cast in stone and subject the applicable department/division/unit takes to modification over time, for ease of reference action to ensure that environmental and social the current Strategic Objectives are reproduced impacts of all proposed projects/activities are in the following Box 1. This firm anchoring in investigated and more generally that they reflect corporate policy tenets of sustainability and best practices, lessons learned, and other environmental protection is certainly a positive available technical knowledge. characteristic of FAO’s project portfolio. FAO’s vision is of a world free of hunger and malnutrition where food and agriculture contribute to improving the living standards of all, especially the poorest, in an economically, socially and environmentally sustainable manner. Global Goals of Members To foster the achievement of this vision and of the Millennium Development Goals, FAO will promote the continuing contribution of food and sustainable agriculture to the attainment of these three global goals: a) Reduction of the absolute number of people suffering from hunger, progressively ensuring a world in which all people at all times have sufficient safe and nutritious food that meets their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life. b) Elimination of poverty and the driving forward of economic and social progress for all with increased food production, enhanced rural development and sustainable livelihoods. c) Sustainable management and utilization of natural resources, including land, water, air, climate and genetic resources, for the benefit of present and future generations. The EIA shall address both positive and negative potential environmental impacts of the given Vision Governing principles project, any related social implications, as well as eventual transboundary effects. EIA evaluates Building on these corporate Strategic Objectives Strategic Objectives a project’s potential environmental and social and the practical experience FAO has gained A. Sustainable intensification of crop production. risks and impacts in its area of influence. The over the years in managing field operations in FAO EIA procedures do not substitute for specific agriculture and rural development, fisheries, environmental assessment requirements that forestry, and natural resources management, the C. Sustainable management and use of fisheries and aquaculture resources. countries/ resource partners may request to be EIA process is also to be consistent with a number D. Improved quality and safety of food at all stages of the food chain. met. Should a project be subject to such external of principles, as described in Annex 1. procedures, the latter may be adhered to, so long as they involve levels of analysis that are similar to, or more stringent than those of FAO. B. Increased sustainable livestock production. E. Sustainable management of forests and trees. F. Sustainable management of land, water and genetic resources and improved responses to global environmental challenges affecting food and agriculture. The decision whether these mandatory external G. ...
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